Red Hook Brooklyn, Streets

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Red Hook Streets

I am interested in Red Hook because two sets of my ancestors lived and worked in Red Hook in the late 1800s to 1900. Both families subsequently moved to Hoboken, New Jersey.

I have taken a look at addresses connected with my ancestors and other addresses, such as tavern and store location, that were important in the neighborhood and give an indication of what life was like in Red Hook like during the period in question.


Partition Street (Later Coffey Street)



Photo Maggie Land Blanck, 2014

This cluster of house on Coffey street (formally Partition street) predate 1886. They are shown on the 1886 map of Ward 12. These houses are surrounded by a full block of one story warehouses that also pre date 1886.



Photo Maggie Land Blanck, 2014

This section of the warehouses face Conover street.



Photo Maggie Land Blanck, 2014


Families on Partition Street:
  1. Bray, 72 Partition, (Richards). The Brays were the proprietors of a liquor/grocery store.

  2. Red Hook Celebrities, Michael Coffey Coffey street was named for the politician, Michael Coffey.

  3. Red Hook Celebrities, the Crehan Family, 165 Coffey/Partition Ada C. Rehan (nee Crehan) was a famous stage actress.

  4. Hoehln, 125 Partition (corner Van Brunt) The Hoehn family had a grocery/liquor store at the corner of Van Brunt and Partition.

  5. Looney The Looney Family were liquor dealers. Edward Looney and his son, Patrick Looney were local policemen.

  6. Mathilde Ruppanner, midwife, lived at 121 Partition in 1883. Mathilde Ruppanner was the midwife at the birth of at least three of my ancestors. See below.

  7. Sullivan Dennis Sullivan was a local politician.


121 Partition [later Coffey] Street

121 Partition street was/is on the south east side of Partition near Van Brunt. The 1886 map shows a 25 feet wide brick structure at this address. Partition street is now called Coffey Street, after the Red Hook politician Michael J. Coffey (1839-1907).

Mathilde Ruppanner was a Red Hook "nurse" midwife who signed the birth certificates of Christian August Petermann in 1883, Marie Sophia Kettler in 1886 and Gertrude Friderike Kettler in 1889. Mathilde Ruppanner lived at 121 Partition street from at least 1880 to at least 1883 (when she certified the birth of Christian Petermann). Mathilda Ruppanner was born circa 1825 in Prussia. She married Alexander Ruppanner. It seems to have been a second marriage. She had at least one child, Paul Buhr, circa 1851.

1865: Brooklyn, Ward 15, brick 5 family, Alexander "Reubenmer" 44, born Switzerland, tailor, Matilda Reubenmer 40, wife, born Prussia, no occupation, Paul Reubenmer 14, child born Prussia

1870: Jersey city, New Jersey Alex Ruppanner 44, born Switzerland, liquor dealer $6,000, $2,000, Matilda Ruppanner 46, keeping house, born Prussia, Paul Ruppanner 18, born Prussia

1875: 145 Van Dyke frame two family, Alexander Ruppanon 50, born Switzerland, tailor, Matilde Ruppanner 50, born Germany midwife

1876 and 1878: Alexander Ruppanner 145 Vandyke Brooklyn, New York, USA Occupation: Tailor Publication Title: Brooklyn, New York, City Directory, 1878. Mathilda not listed.

1880: The 1880 Census shows Alex Ruppanner age 54 tailor born Prussia, and Ruppanner, Mathilda age 55, midwife born German at 121 Partition Street, Brooklyn Ward 12. They were the only people in the building.

1881: M. Ruppanner was listed as a nurse, 121 Partition Street in the 1881 Brooklyn directory.

1882: Alexander Ruppanner 121 Partition Brooklyn, New York, USA Occupation: Tailor Publication Title: Brooklyn, New York, City Directory, 1882. Mathilda not listed.

1884: Mathhilde Ruppanner 121 Partition street April 1883 birth of Christian August Petermann.

1886: Alexander Ruppanner 49 Dikeman Brooklyn, New York, USA Occupation: Laborer Publication Title: Brooklyn, New York, City Directory, 1886. Mathilda not listed

In 1886 the Brooklyn Department of Health required all midwives to make "returns of birth of which they had charge". In 1895 "There are doubtless more than twice as many physicians as midwives in Brooklyn". The majority of those how used midwives were foreign-born according to the Annual Report of the Board of Health of the Department of Health of the City of New York in 1894.

1887: Matilda G Ruppanner 53 Dikeman Nurse PUBLICATION TITLE: Brooklyn, New York, City Directory, 1887

1889: In April 1889 Mathilde Ruppanner of 53 Dikeman Street was the person who certified the birth of Gertrude Frederike Ketter at 87 Fery st.

1889: Alexander Rupanner Birth Year: abt 1826 Age: 63 Death Date: 11 Dec 1889 Death Place: Kings, New York, USA Certificate Number: 17436

Death of Alexander Ruppaner, probate, 53 Dykeman street, December 11, 1889, personal property $750 his widow no children or descendents of father or mother but one brother --- Anton Ruppanner of the City of New York. Executor Dora Ruppanner.

Alexander Rupanner Death Date: Dec 1889 Cemetery: Green-Wood Cemetery RUPANNER ALEXANDER 1889-12-13 17245

1890: Death Matilda D Ruppanier, March 1890 buried Greenwood

Greenwood: RUPPANNIER MATILDA D. 1890-03-12 17245

1890: Probate Mathilde Ruppaner petition of Line [Lina] Epperlien, City of Newark, Essex co., New Jersey (she) was the executrix of the last will and testimony of Mathilde Ruppaner City of Brooklyn, who died 9th of March Brooklyn. Will dated March 6, 1890. witnesses by Charles Wohlfarth of 179 Richards street and Robert Tiedermann 42 Partition st, "no husband but an only son Paul Buhr at St Francisco, California of full age"

1910: San Francisco, Paul Buhr 59, born New York, marine engineer, Betty Buhr 57 Pauline H Buhr 27 Alma F Buhr 25

In 1884 Augustus Kittridge, a cook, age 34 of 121 Partition Street was taken into custody for the alleged assault of a ten year old boy named Andrew McGlynn. The boy was purported to have been taken to Kittridge's apartment where his hands and feet were tied and an unknown liquid was poured down his throat. The boys screams frightened Kittridge to the point that he released the boy who subsequently vomited.

In August 1885 Michael Rooney of No. 121 Partition Street notified the police that the body of a female infant about a week old was floating in the river at the foot of Conover street.

In November 1886 121 Partition street Brooklyn was listed as the address of Henry Reiter, deceased.

Dora Hamerstrom 121 Coffey Street

In April 1890 Dora Hamerstrom had a grocery store at "121 Partition" when she was robbed of $10. Two men entered her store. One man bought a 5 cent paper for smoking tobacco and gave her a two dollar bill. She went to the back to make change. When she returned the other man asked for a pail of coal. She went out to the front to fill that order. When she came back in the store both men had disappeared along with her box of cash.

1884: William Hammerstroem 129 Partition Occupation: Lighterman Publication Title: Brooklyn, New York, City Directory, 1884

1890: Death of William Hammerstrom

1892: Kings Dora Hammerstrom age 40 born Germany store keeper, Benj Harms machinist age 23.

1894: Hammerstrom Dora widow of William Grocer 121 Coffey street

1900: Ward 12, "121 Coffey", Dora Hammarstrom 48, widow, born Germany, 2 children none living, immigrated 1869, grocery, Bernard Harms, cousin, 31, machinist

1901: Dora Hammarstrom 121 Coffey widow William Hammarstrom Publication Title: Brooklyn, New York, City Directory, 1902

1903: Death - Dora Hammerstrom Age: 50 Death Date: 23 Nov 1903 Death Place: Kings, New York, USA Certificate Number: 19849

Buried Greenwood

1904: Probate - petitioner Benjamin Harms of Brooklyn, - $261 dollars- sister Matie Behnken 402 Grand street, Hoboken sister, Benjamin Harms 121 Coffey street Brooklyn, cousin

Greenwood:
HAMMERSTROM DORA 1903-11-25 776415 (Kings death cert #19849)
HAMMERSTROM JOHN 1898-09-24 776415 (Kings cert # 16392 listed as "Charles", age 51)
HAMMERSTROM MARGARETTE 1880-03-21 776415 (Hammarstrom, Margret - Age 27 days March 19, 1880 #2331)
HAMMERSTROM WILLIAM O. 1890-03-27 776415

In the same building in 1900:
  1. McCarthy, James, head, 35, born New York, peddles vegetables,

  2. Reiter, Henry, head, 63, house carpenter, Bridget, wife, 43, Gieson [or w], Mabel, ward, 16, folder paper boxes

    Henry Reiter age 66 of 121 Coffey street, husband of Bridget died May 1902.

  3. Gieson [or w] William, head, 49 cannot read,

  4. Cavanagh, Winifred, head, 41, John, 18, ruler printer, Edward, 14, errand boy Anna, 13

In 1891 James Cavanagh age 26 [or 36] of 121 Partition Street was arrested along with two other young men for stealing a "quantity of tools" from a pile driver at the Union Ferry slip at the foot of Sackett street. Cavanagh was found asleep on the vessel.

1892: same adress as Dora Hammerstrom - Kavanagh, Winifred, 32, Fanny age 13, John age 10, Edward age 6, Annie age 4


135 Coffey Street

In 1896 after the death of their father, Fritz Kettler, in Hoboken, New Jersey, Gertrude and Frederick Kettler were placed in the Brooklyn Orphans Asylum on Atlantic Avenue by their mother who gave her address as 135 Coffey street.

In 1894 William Hoehn was listed at 135 Coffey at the probate of the will of Henry Hoehn. See Hoehn

In January 1897 Albert C Schreiber was listed at 135 Coffey street as a qualified Tapper and Sewage engineer.

1900 - Ward 12, on Wolcott street, Albert Schreiber 31, engineer, Agnes Schreiber 27, Helen Schreiber 10, Harry Schreiber 8, Vaginia Schreiber 1

The 1886 map shows a brick construction at 135 Coffey (Partition) street. In 2014 it was the home of a mixed income co-op opened in 2011. It contains 60 units at 71 and 79 Wolcott and 135 Coffey.

1900: 135 Coffey street,

  1. McGowan, John J head, 32, Ireland, boiler maker, Elizabeth, wife, 31, New York, Marie C daughter, 6 Thomas J son 7 months

  2. Hearon, Edward, 39, cook on tug boat, Mary, wife, 34, Charles, son, 12, William son, 1 all born New York

  3. Love, Charles, 42, born England, blacksmith, Louise, wife, 40, born Germany, Frederick A, son 16, messenger boy, Mary E, daughter, 12, born New Jersey William M, son 10, Frances S. daughter 9 Charles P. son 1, rest born New York.

  4. Nelson, William 25, born New Jersey, blacksmith, Mabel wife age 22, born New York

  5. Schneider, Jacob, age 38 born Germany, elevator construction, Lena wife 31, Marie R age 3 Helen age 2 Louisa age 2 months

  6. Liegl, John, 43, born Germany, fish smoker, Anna 42 born Germany, Josie 15, Lillian r age 10, both born New york

In the 1900 census William Hoehn 34, saloon keeper, Christina, 32, Florence, daughter 11, were near 135 Coffey, at 404 Van Brunt.


146 Coffey Street - 1895

Vincenzo Depaolo an Italian shoemaker of 146 Coffey street took a glass of beer at the back of his shop with two other Italians. He passed out and the two stole his watch and chain, two pair of trousers, a gold ring and some money. (May 25, 1895 BE)

In 1900 146 Coffey was listed as a plumbers shop.


165 Partition (later Coffey) Street

The Crehan family lived at 165 Partition street in a row of two story houses known at Quality row. This row of five houses were surrounded by warehouses and still exist on what is now called Coffey street.

The 1886 map shows a brick structure with no designated width.

See Red Hook Celebrities


Van Brunt

Van Brunt was/is a main shopping street.


155 Van Brunt - north of Hamilton

1895: November 21, Eugene Dougherty had a restaurant at 155 Van Brunt in November 1895 where Peter Malledy, age 70 of 32 Hamilton ave, suddenly died. Malledy had ordered supper and a drink and when the waiter arrive with the drink Malledy was dead. Heart trouble was thought to be the issue but an inquest was ordered.

NUC Death Index Kings: Mullady, Peter, age 65, Nov 20, 1895, #20139

1901: Gustav Ulfrand was running the restaurant at 255 Van Brunt in June 1901. He and his wife lived in an apartment above restaurant. Sometime after 10 o'clock when they had closed up for the night the restaurant was broken into and three mirrors were stolen. The mirrors were found in the possession of Dominick McGarvey age 24 of 483 Henry street who pleaded guilty.

See also Ulstrom/Sustrand, Gustav, Red Hook Restaurants


147 Van Brunt - north of Hamilton

In 1877, 147 Van Brunt was a three story house.

In 1885 John Willis had a saloon at 147 Van Brunt.

In 1886 Michael Brady 22 of 147 Van Brunt was bitten on the leg by a "savage" dog which was "running amuck" on Hamilton ave. The animal bit three or four people before it was shot by a policeman.

In 1887 Mrs. Brady of 147 Van Brunt swore that Patrolman Edward Murgagh had entered her house and "used foul and insulting language to her."

1890 Sweeney, James J. 147 Van Brunt liquor

1897: August Swanberg was running a restaurant at 147 Van Brunt in February 1897 when the bartender, John Johnson, was assaulted by Policeman William Baker after Johnson refused to obey Baker's order to supply a young woman with an upstairs room. In addition another policeman, Thomas Mahan held a pistol to Johnson's head.

See Red Hook, Brooklyn, Liquor "Dealers" Mid to Late 1800s - Neighborhood Opposition to Saloons for more on Swanberg and the 1897 incident.


233 Van Brunt

1875: September the liquor store of John Powers at 233 Van Brunt was robbed. $6 taken from cash drawer.

1876: Ellen Costello, 40 of 233 Van Brunt had an argument with her husband at their residence. She threw him off the stoop, inflicting a scalp wond to the head. She was arrested.

1883: Two men entered the cigar store of George Balfers [Balfe] 233 Van Brunt and stole $10 three bottles of champagne and one box of cigars worth $20.

1884: Balfe, George W. liquors, 233 Van Brunt, home 245 Van Brunt.

See Balfe

1886: On the 1886 map corner of north east corner Van Brunt and Delevan brick 23 feet wide.

1898: For Sale in 1898 "$3,250 buys 233 Van Brunt st near Hamilton Ferry; last one new left, 3 story brick store and flat, no taxes for two years."

1901: Jan 30

FRANCES HELLON Frances HELLON died in St. Peter's Hospital yesterday after a (missing)ness. She was born in Brooklyn thirty-three years ago, and was the widow of John HELLON. Three children survive. The funeral will take place from her late home, 233 Van Brunt street, to-morrow afternoon, with interment at Greenwood Cemetery. James F. REDMOND, of 90 King street, is in charge of the arrangements.

New York Public Library, 233 Van Brunt


260 Van Brunt

1893: 4th District !2 Ward Polling Place 260 Van Brunt - store

1906: 260 Van Brunt cigar store.

See Murray


269 Van Brunt

269 Van Brunt J. M. McGrath Imported wines and Liguors - Photo courtesy Bob Breen March 2016

John Schuller, butcher, is one of the men in this photo. His butcher shop was said to be next door to 269 Van Brunt.

See Schuller

See McGrath

and O'Hara


282-284 Van Brunt

1889: August, "At 282 Van Brunt street Mr. L. Loring will build a three story brick structure, 20x65, for store, lodge room and one family, to cost $5,000."

In 1890 12 Ward Democrats assembled in the handsome new rooms in Erie Hall 184 Van Brunt street.

In 1890, December, the Knights of Pythias met at Erie Hall on Van Brunt Street.

1892: 12the Ward Association met at Erie Hall 282 Van Brunt.

1892: A fire in September 1892 at the Occidental Oil Company at 137 to 145 Imlay street threatened the houses on Van Brunt including that owned by Samuel Loring at 282 Van Brunt. The building on Imlay was described as a two story brick factory that was "well stocked" with cotton seed oil and "manufactured oil". The building was totally destroyed.

1893: The Norwegian Republican club of Brooklyn held a large and enthusiastic "assemblage" at Erie Hall Van Brunst street.

1894: Knights of Maccabees met at Samuel Loring's Erie Hall 282 Van Brunt.

1895: Knights of Pythian met in Erie Hall 282 Van Brunt.

1896: Knights of Pythian met in Erie Hall 282 Van Brunt.

1896: Charles Anderson age 34 saloon owner at 282 Van Brunt was arrested for violation of the Excise Law.

1896: February, A thief broke into the saloon of Charles Anderson through a rear window. $14 in cash and a $10 overcoat were taken. Charles Anderson was not listed as a saloon owner, bartender or at 282 Van Brunt in 1895. Chas. 282 Van Brunt liquors was listed in 1897. Not listed at 282 Van Brunt in 1898.

1896: McKinley League formed at Erie Hall 282 Van Brunt. 12 the Ward Republican meeting was held at Erie Hall 282 Van Brunt.

1897: October, 12th Ward Low men met at 282 Van Brunt street - Erie Hall.

1897: August - The longshoremen of Brooklyn met in Erie Hall 282 Van Brunt to organize Branch No. 11 of men employed or living in Red Hook Point.

1899: Thomas J McNamara was nominated as the Republican candidate for alderman in the 9th Assembly district at Erie Hall 282 Van Brunt.

1900: October the nomination of Samuel Loring was ratified at Erie Hall 282 Van Brunt.

1901: Several political meetings were held at Erie Hall 282 Van Brunt. In November 1901 Louis Reiman, a bartender at 282 Van Brunt, lodged a complaint against John Flannagan for breaking two windows.

1903: 9th Assembly district citizen's Union Association helt their meeting in Erie Hall near Tremont street.

1905: Municipal Ownership league of the 9th Assembly District met at Erie Hall, 282 Van Brunt.

1906: The Business Men's Relief Committee of Red Hook and South Brooklyn met to plan a benefit to aid the victims of the earth quake in San Francisco.

1909: An Auction by order of Mrs. Loring at 282 Van Brunt offered: furniture, carpets, a Singer shoemaker's sewing machine, quilts, pillows, mirrors, ice boxes, china and glassware.

1911: The Visitation Lyceum club met at Erie Hall 282 Van Brunt. They continued to do so for years.

1911: 284 Van Brunt was listed as a polling place - Pool Parlor

1916: January, The Visitation Lyceum of 282 Van Brunt held an old fashion minstral show Prospect Hall.

There were more meetings listed in the newspapers in Erie Hall between 1890 and 1911, but the above is enough of a sampling to see that it was a popular place for political meetings. 282 Van Brunt was on the west side of Van Brunt between Tremont and Verona. The 1886 map indicates a brick structure. 282 is the 2014 is the home of the Red Hook Laundry. It is a very pretty building with quite elaborated brick work and what look like some tera cotta inserts.

Samuel Loring

Samuel Loring was politically and socially active in Red Hook in the late 1800, early 1900s. He was an active member of several lodges. In 1900 he was a candidate from the Republican Party for assemblyman from the 9th District.

1882: Samuel Loring 290 Van Brunt, furniture

1885: Samuel Loring 233 Van Brunt Brooklyn, New York, USA Furniture Publication Title: Brooklyn, New York, City Directory, 1885

1891: Samuel Loring 284 Van Brunt Brooklyn, New York, USA Upholsterer Publication Title: Brooklyn, New York, City Directory, 1891

1892: Ward 12, no addresses in this census, Samuel, age 41, born England, furniture, Levenia age 39, born England

1894: Samuel Loring 282 Van Brunt American Almanac

1895: Samuel Loring lost the race for 9th district assemblyman.

1896, 1897: Samuel Loring Real Estate at 157 Union street was advertising properties for sale or let.

1897: Transfer of property from Lavinia Loring wife of Samuel Loring to Ole Petterson, Van Dyke st n s e, 250 ft s e Richards, 25x100 h*l Mort $3,-00.

1901: Van Brunt st n w s 100 ft s w Verona st 25x90 Samuel Loring to Lavinia Loring his wife

1902: Samuel Loring Realestate Publication Title: Brooklyn, New York, City Directory, 1902

1906: Samuel Loring 40 Beard Brooklyn, New York, USA Restaurant Publication Title: Brooklyn, New York, City Directory, 1906

Listed in the 1910 (at 115 Union, no children) 1915 (62 Sullivan Street), 1920, 1925 censuses in Brooklyn, both Samuel and Lavinia.

Death: Samuel Loring Birth Year: abt 1851 Age: 81 Death Date: 28 Feb 1932 Death Place: Kings, New York, USA Certificate Number: 4498

1932: Greenwood, Samuel lot 28307 section 136

1938: Greenwood, "Levina" Loring lot 28307 section 136


304 Van Brunt

Van Brunt was (and still is) the main drag of Red Hook.

Dietrich Winkelmann in front of his candy store at 304 Van Brunt, circa 1918. This image was shared by Jeffrey Pennell, March 2013.

Diedrich Winkelmann was born in German circa 1848. He and his family ran a confectionery store on Van Brunt for many years. See Winkelmann

304 Van Brunt 1930-40s


311 Van Brunt

1880: December, fifty yards of red flannel valued at $20 was stolen from David Meyer's dry goods store at 311 Van Brunt.

1895: In 1895 a fire at a tenement on Van Brunt resulted in the death of six members of the Ryan family: father, mother and four children. A narrow enclosed wooden stairways which led from the outside of the building on the King street side and went to the third floor hindered escape from the building. The building on the southeast corner of King and Van Brunt was of brick and four stories high. There was one family living on each floor with a saloon on the ground floor. The building was said to have been build before 1873 and the establishment of the Building Department. At some point the main entrance from King street was altered. The stairs which had existed on the inside of the building were removed to make more room for the store and the outside stairs were built. It was speculated that these alterations were made without a permit. The saloon on the first floor had a storm shed to shelter the side door on the King Street side.

The Ryans lived on the top floor and apparently died of smoke inhalation. The had resided in South Brooklyn for many years. The family included Charles age 50, Ellen 47, Sarah 18, Margaret 14, Elizabeth 11 and Hannah (or Maggie) 11. Hannah was a niece of the Ryans. An older daughter, Mrs. Hannah McPadden age 19 was the only surviving member of the family. Mr. Ryan was born in Tipperary. Mrs. Ryan was also born in Ireland but they were married in Brooklyn.

Patrick Finnigan kept the saloon at 311. Charles Ryan was said to have a saloon diagonally opposite on the north west corner of King and Van Brunt. He was not listed as such in the Brooklyn Directories. The 1892 census did lit him as a liquor dealer. One paper said he ran a liquor business at Union and Van Brunt. Charles Ryan liquors 64 Union was listed in 1890 and 1891.

NYC Death index:
Ryan Charles 48 y Nov 7 1895 19511 Kings
Ryan Ellen 47 y Nov 7 1895 19512 Kings
Ryan Elizabeth 11 y Nov 7 1895 19516 Kings
Ryan Hannah 11 y Nov 7 1895 19515
Ryan Margaret 14 y Nov 7 1895 19514 Kings
Ryan Sarah 18 y Nov 7 1895 19513 Kings


311 Van Brunt Brooklyn Daily Eagle November 7, 1895 (http://fultonhistory.com/Fulton.html)

The 1886 map shows 311 Van Brunt as a 25 feet wide brick structure at the corner of King and Van Brunt on the north east side.


339 Van Brunt

The Demars family manufactured Kentucky Jean overalls at 339 Van Brunt. See DeMars


343 Van Brunt

Myles McKeon had a undertakers business at 343 Van. Brunt.

1880: 325 Van Brunt, Miles Mckeon 33, undertaker, Bridget Mckeon 28, John Mckeon 3, Kate M. Mckeon 2, Joseph Mckeon 1, Hagan, Mary 16, servant

1892: Ward 12, Myles McKeon, 43, born Ireland, undertaker, Bridget 40, Ireland, John 15, Kate 14, Joseph 12, Annie 5, George 1

1900: Mrs. Myles McKeon of 343 Van Brunt street and her children, Anna and george visited her sister in Patchogue in August 1900.

Death of Bridget McKeon 1904: Bridget A McKeon, 51, 27 Jul 1904, Kings, New York, USA, CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 15521.

McKeon at 343 Van brunt st, South Brooklyn, Bridget A beloved wife of Myles McKeon. 1910: Ward 12, 343 Van Brunt, Myles Mckeon 60, widower, immigrated 1863, undertaker, embalmer, Joseph Mckeon 32, musician professional Anna Mckeon 22, George Mckeon 18, clerk insurance, John Wilson 80, boarder

1911: John Wilson born in Ireland had been an employee on Myles McKeon's undertaker for 40 years at the time of his death in March 1911.

1915: Myles McKeon born in Edenderry, County of Kings, Ireland in 1847 was an undertaker in Brooklyn since 1870. He graduated St. Thomas's College, Newridge, Ireland, and came to the United States in 1863. He was first in business in Manhattan and then came to Brooklyn in 1870. He was a member of many Irish societies. He died in January 1915 at his residence at 343 Van Brunt. He was a member of Visitation Church. He was buried in Holy Cross Cemetery. He was survived by two sons, Joseph and George and two daughters, Anna and Mrs. Catherine McEwan and four grandchildren. He was also survived by a sister, Sister Mary Augustine Joseph, Mother Superior of the Convent of the Most Holy Rosary, at Cape Good Hope, South Africa.

1915: 343 Van Brunt, 3 family, Joseph H McKeon 35, undertaker, Anna A McKeon 28, George B McKeon 23, embalmer

In 1942 Joseph H McKeon, funeral director, established 1870, resumed his business at 7106 Fort Hamilton Parkway, Brooklyn, formerly at 476 73rd street and 343 Van Brunt.

In 1888 Myles McKeon brought suit against Maggie Madigan and two of her sisters for non payment of the funeral of her brother, Patrick, a liquor dealer, who died in March 1886. A brother, John Madigan, saloon keeper, was said to have no property. No proof was presented that Maggie was responsible for the bill and the case was dismissed.

See Madigan

In a 1953 reminiscence of old time Red Hook other undertakers were mentioned: Joe Redmond, corner of King and Richards., Shufelt & Strobel, Myles McKeon & Sons, and Harry Flood. George Seibold took over the Shufelt & Strobel business and still had an establishment at 384 Van Brunt in 1953.

344 Van Brunt

1879: Nicholas Hartung of 344 Van Brunt street Brooklyn won the "capital" prize of $30,000 in the Louisiana Lottery on July 8th. He paid two dollars for the ticket. Nicholas Hartung was said to own a four story brick building and to have a shoe store on the first floor at that address. He and his wife and two sons lived on the floor above the store. He said he played the German, Kentucky, Louisiana and other lotteries and every now and again won some small amount. He once won $150 in the Havana lottery.

1867: Hartung, Nicholas bootmke. Conover and King 1867

1870: Ward 12, Brooklyn, $7,000, $2,00 Nicholas Hartung 46, Bavaria, boot and shoe maker, Marianna Hartung 39, Bavaria, Edward Hartung 15, app boot maker, Gustave Hartung 12

1873: 344 Van brunt Nicholas Hartung, bootmaker

1875: 344 Van Brunt brick $6,000, Nicholas Hartung 50, shoemaker, Mary A Hartung 45, Edward Hartung 20, Gustase Hartung 17, Anne Schuertzer 17, servant

1879: 344 Van brunt Nicholas Hartung, bootmaker

1880: The German Catholics of South Brooklyn had their own church - St. Bernard's German Catholic Church was located at the corner of Hicks and Rapelya streets.

In 1872 the congregation was made up of about 80 families (about 250 people). They initially held their service at the Temperance Hall on Hamilton ave. In 1875 they purchased the building that once housed the Tabernacle Baptist Church.

When improvements were made and decorations enhanced in 1880 a major benefactor was Nicholas Hartung. Nicholas Hartung, a prominent member of the congregation, presented the church with paintings of the Stations of the Cross. Much of the beauty of the church's altars was also due to his generosity.

See Red Hook Churches

1882: 344 Van brunt Nicholas Hartung, bootmaker

1883: Solomon Steiner the proprietor of a dry goods store at "329 Van Brunt" was fined $5 "for keeping his store open on Monday morning - in "violation of the penal code".

1890 - 1899: Steiner, Solomon, 344 Van Brunt Dry Goods

1891: Death - Nicholas Hartung died at 217 18th street Brooklyn age 67. He was born in Bavaria and came to Brooklyn circa 1850. He was a shoemaker in South Brooklyn.

"Eight years ago he retired with a comfortable fortune."
He left a widow and two sons.

1892: Solomon Steiner, 46 born Bohemia, dry goods store, Rose age 37, born New York Sidney, 10, Arthur 7, Jesse 4, servant born Ireland.

1897: Rose Steiner age 42 years died January 28, 344 Van brunt street.

1905: 5th ave., Agustave Hartung Head M 46y United States, furniture, Hennrietta Hartung Wife F 46y United States, Elizabeth Hartung Daughter F 20y United States, Gustave Hartung Son M 18y United States, Joseph Hartung Son M 16y United States, Mary Hartung Daughter F 14y United States, Henretta Hartung Daughter F 12y United States, Emily Hartung Daughter F 10y United States, Louise Hartung Daughter F 8y United States, Arthur Hartung Son M 5y United States, George Hartung Son M 3y United States, Mary Hartung Mother F 75y Germany

1905: 344 Van Brunt, Soloman Stiner 59, dry goods, Josephine Stiner 35, wife, Sidney Stiner 24, doctor, Arthur A Stiner 21, lace business, Jessie Stiner 17, student

1910: 344 Van Brunt, Soloman Steiner 65, Austria, merchant dry goods, Josephine Steiner 45, Wisconsin, Arthur S Steiner 25, salesman lace department, Jesse Steiner 22, daughter, none, Willie M Christoffman 22 servant


351 Van Brunt

In 1900 there was a fire at 351 Van Burnt. Isaac Herman had a men's furnishing store on the first floor of the four story brick building. The top three floors contained flats with about 20 tenants. The property was owned by James J. Brierton who lived with his family on the 2nd floor. A son, Henry J. Brierton, a newspaperman lived on the third floor. Other family members included Thomas, a fireman who was called to the fire, Katherine Brierton age 63, Kittie Brierton age 24 and John Brierton, no age given.

1870: Bryerton, James, 48, engineer, $2,000, born Canada, Catherine, 40, born Ireland, Henry, 5, Sylvester, 1. Only family in building.

1880: No business listed at 351 Van Brunt. 351 was listed as "rear". 351 "rear" listed the Bryerton family, James 50 engineer, born Canada, Catherine, 43, born Ireland, Henry, 16 working in dry goods store, Sylvester 11, John 10, Thomas 6, Catherine 4 and William 2. This would suggest that 351 front was built after 1880.

1890:

James Brierton of 351 Van Brunt street was playing pool at Tracy and McGech saloon at 128 Elizabeth street when a dispute arose and he hit John T Burns over the head with a cue.

1891: Alfred Watkelson, age 3, was hit by a wagon in front of his home at 351 Van Brunt and killed.

1906: Brierton, Octobe 4, 1906, James J. Brierton senior at his residence 351 Van Brunt. Mass Visitation.

1909: February 13, 1909, Catherine beloved wife of Lieutenant Thomas Brierton, died at her residence 351 Van Brunt. Mass Visitation.

1913 Death : Katherine Brierton March 20, 1913 at her residence, 351 Van Brunt, beloved widow of James J. Brierton. Mass Visitation. Buried Holy Cross.


353 Van Brunt

William Kentler, born in Prussia circa 1821, established a dry goods store at 353 Van Brunt in 1854.

1860: Ward 12, no address, William Kentler 39, mariner, Margaret Kentler 40, William Kentler 11, Charles Kentler 9, Henrietta Kentler 7, three families in building.

1870: Ward 12, No street number listed, William Kentler 49, dry goods merchant, $6,000, $2,000, born Prussia, Margaret Kentler 45, Ireland, William Kentler 21, clerk in store, Henrietta Kentler 17. 4 families in building.

1880: 353 Van Brunt, Kentler, William age 30 dry good store, born New york, Emma 25, wife, Mary 5, William 2, Catherine 1, Emma 2 months and a servant. There were 8 "families" in the building. Next door at 355 was Kentler, william age 59, no occupation, rheumatism and kidney, born Prussia and his wife, Margaret age 56 born Ireland.

1883 Death : William Kentler, age 62, Kings 3076

1883 Death: December 23, after a painful illness, May Rose (Maize) daughter of William and Emma Kentler age 8 years 7 months and 14 days

1895: William Kentler was living at 546 Second Street as early as 1895 when his son, Charles, celebrated his 8th birthday with a party for about 70 children, 353 Van Brunt.

When the fire occurred at 351 in 1900 it also spread to 353 Van Brunt, a dry goods store owned and operated by William Kentler, jr.

1910: Ward 22, 546 2nd street, William Kentler 60, operator, real estate, Emma F Kentler 55, 16 children 6 still living, Katherine M Kentler 28, nurse, health department, Charles J Kentler 23, clerk export, Idella J Kentler 18, Edgar S Kentler 16, Jessie F Kentler 14, Virginia Kentler 11, Greta Hyelm 30 servant

1911 Death: August 13, William Kentler died after a short illness at his home at 546 Second street. He had been engaged in the dry goods business in the 12th ward for many years. He retired 7 years before his death. He had also been involved in the real estate business in the 22 ward. He was active in many organizations including several connected to the Catholic church. He had been a member of Visitation church in Red Hook. He was survived by his widow, Emma (nee Smart) four daughters, two sons, and a brother, Charles. Buried Holy Cross.

1911: J. Freidman was listed as a dry goods dealer at 353 Van Brunt street


Kentler Established 1854


356 Van Brunt - Chinese Laundry (1892)

1860: Ward 12, Sanger, Michael, 36, born Bavaria, boot maker, Mary 26, Mary 3 Otilda 1

1875: Ward 12, brick $4,500, Michael Sanger 51, shoemaker, born Germany, Mary Sanger 18, Richard Sanger 15, Caroline Sanger 6

In 1880 Michael Sanger, shoemaker was listed at home at 356 Van Brunt.

1885: Michael Sanger, 356 Van Brunt, Brooklyn, New York, USA, Occupation: Merchant, Publication Title: Brooklyn, New York, City Directory, 1885

1892: Quong Lee age 19, Chine, Laundry, Chew (?), Fun 20, China, laundry, Michael E Sanger, 67 Germany shoemaker, Carrie, Sanger, 22, Mary Sanger, 33, dressmaker, Richard Sanger, 36

In September 1895 Charlie Shu was running a Chinese laundry at 356 Van Brunt when Chu Tien a Chinese laundryman hung himself in the rear of the store.

In the Trow's Business Directory of 1899 an Chinese Laundry was listed 356 Van Brunt.

Charlie Shu was not listed by ancestry.com in any census.

1900 Census: 356 Van Brunt, Quong Lee, head, age 27, immigrated 1892, Chu, Lee, partner, age 26, immigrated 1893, Chu, Ling, boarder, age 25, immigrated 1893, all born China, all laundry man, Sanger, Michael, head, 76 widower, landlord, born Germany, immigrated 1847, Mary daughter, 41, upholstering, Richard, son, 39, painting, Caroline, daughter 30

1912: April 5, Van Brunt st No 356 M Sangar et al to C Behnken, rela estate transfer


358 Van Brunt

The Graef Family was at 358 Van Bruntfrom at least 1870 to 1881. See Graef

358 Van Brunt was called Sullivan Hall through the 1880s. See Sullivan

The 1886 map shows a brick structure in front with a wood frame extension behind. It is located on the west side of the street - Third building from the south corner of Sullivan.


364 Van Brunt

1880: December 11, A bed quilt, valued at $5 was stolen from James Fitzgerald's dry goods store at 364 Van Brunt.

1888: The dry goods store of James L Fitzgerald at 364 Van Brunt street was robbed of: one gold ring set with rubies, one seal ring, one imitation diamond ring, half a dozen silk scarfs, half a dosen bottles of cologne, and a dozen gold plated scarf pins.


365 Van Brunt

1885: June - A two story frame house was moved from 365 Van Brunt to 16 Wolcott street. Ten day later workmen removed the jacks. Two hours after that the house collapsed in ruins. (New York Herald)

1885 : November, Brandenberg, the druggist at 365 Van Brunt owned a vicious dog who severely bit Charles Jackson age 49 of Partition street.

1890: Braudenberg, John N 365 Van Brunt, druggist.

1894: "Braudenbert", John 365 Van Brunt

1899: Grom, Otto, B 365 Van Brung, druggist

1913: Otto Grom of 365 Van Brunt st had a Excise Licence to sell liquor.

1916: Grom, Otto, C. B. 365 Van Brunt

1920: Leo Canter [or Kanter] druggist shot twice defending store No 365 Van Brunt, Brooklyn, form three hold up men. May 26, 1920, The Evening World

1921: Kantor L. E. 365 Van Brunt (The Era Druggist)

1945: Grom, Otto at his home 365 Van Brunt, father of Priscilla V. Cramer, and Viola L "Brandenberg", Brother of John, Dr. Joseph B and Dr. Fredrick H Grom. Buried Greenwood.

365 Van Brunt is currently the home of Fort Defiance Restaurant.


376 Van Brunt

1872: The 12th Ward Greeley and Brown Club met at 376 Van Brunt.

1873: October, the 12th Ward Liberal Association met at 376 Van Brunt.

1876: The Republican Association met at 376 Van Brunt.

1880: In 1880 376 Van Brunt was called Hoffman Hall and was the meeting place of the Thomas J. Sheridan Campaign club.

1890: Sullivan Denis B, Liquor 376 Van Brunt. See Sullivan

1890: April 26, the 12th ward Democratic Association met in Sullivan's Hall "376 Van Brunt". About 60 people attended.

1892: Listed as a butcher - there is no address.

1901: Welsch, Heyman, grocer/butcher 376 Van Brunt

The Red Hook Pharmacy is located at 376 Van Brunt.

1905: 376 Van Brunt, Welsch, Hyman, head born France age 49, butcher, Grunbausm Sam lodger, born Germany age 22, butcher, Pettersen, Bernt T 56 born Norway, lighterman, Peter son age 26 born US., elevator operator, Annie daughter 28, George T step son 13 born Norway, Birger son age 3 born US, and Benny, Wm E 23, iron worker, Ellen wife, 21, Walter E son, age 9 months, Edward A father age 54, no occupation, all born US.

1911: 376 Van Brunt was the butcher shop of Frenchman Heymen Welsch, born circa 1856, who lived at 534 9th street. He died in March 1911 age 55. He left two brothers, Daniel and Samuel, and three sisters.

In July 1911 376 Van Brunt between Wolcott and Dikeman, was for sale at auction to settle the estate of H Welsch. The building was described as a 3 story frame with a large store with extension, and "two floors (8 rooms) over store".


382 Van Brunt


Photo Maggie Land Blanck, 2013

Alfred A. During, a Dane, had a newsstand and lived on Partition street in 1880. By 1890 he had moved his newsstand/cigar store to 280 Van Brunt street. In 1896 he bought 382 Van Brunt street from Mary Gough, the widow of Edward Gough, a baker who was at 382 Van Brunt as early as 1853. Alfred A. During's widow, Meta de Groot During, a Germany, continued to live there and run a newsstand/cigar store until at least 1910. Sometime after that the business was taken over by Paul J. Trede, a German, who was married to Dina De Groot, a sister of Meta During. The Tredes were at 382 Van Brunt until at least the 1940s. An advertisement of businesses in South Brooklyn listed P. J. Trede Candy at 382 Van Brunt.

1852/53: Directory, Gough, Edward baker, Van Brunt near Dikeman

1855: Ward 13 ED1, brick 3,000 no address, Gough, Edward, 30, baker, Mary 26 both born Ireland, Edward, 3, Mary 1 a boarder and a servant. 1864: Gough, Edward, baker Van Brunt near Dikeman.

1872/73: Edward Gough 382 Van Brunt Brooklyn, New York, USA Occupation: Baker Publication Title: Brooklyn, New York, City Directory, 1873

1880: Partition street, During, Alfred, 32, paper route?, born Denmark, Meta, 35, born Hanover, Hilda, 6, Sophie, 3, both born New York

1880: 172 Partition, Newsagent, Alfred During

1880: 382 Van Brunt street, Grough, Mary, age 55, born Ireland, hat store, Edward 30, William 25, both born New York.

1881: Edward J Gough 382 Van Brunt Brooklyn, New York, USA Occupation: Hatter Publication Title: Brooklyn, New York, City Directory, 1881

1885: Edward Gough Death Date: 1 Apr 1885 Cemetery: Green-Wood Cemetery Burial or Cremation Place: Brooklyn, Kings County (Brooklyn), New York

1887: Grough, Mary, widow Edward, home 382 Van Brunt

1889: Alfred During had a tobacco shop at "280" Van Brunt in 1889.

1890: Elizabeth Tuite daughter of Edward and the late Mary Tuite born County Westmeath, Ireland died at here residence 392 Van Brunt after a long illness, August 29, 1890.

1890: Alfred During, cigars, "380" Van Brunt

1892: Alfred During, born Denmark, was listed with his wife Metar, born Germany, and three children, Hilda, Sophie and William. Alfred was a cigar dealer. No address was given in this census.

1895: Brooklyn To Let Store with fixtures suitable for dry or fancy goods. Inquire 382 Van Brunt st.

1896: Property transfer - Van Brunt st n w s [north west side] 35 ft n e [north east of] Dikeman street 20x75 h&l John F. Gough to Mary Gough same property Edward J., Wm H. and Mary Gough wife James Kaine heirs to Edward Gough to Alfred During. [This is 382 Van Brunt]

1896: Van Brunt st, n w s 35 ft ne of Dikeman 20x75 mort. $3,750 to Alfred During.

1896: During, A. to Mary Gough, widow, Van Brunt st $3,000, real estate transfer

1899 Death: Alfred A. During, age 51 years, 9 months and 12 days, be beloved husband of Meta During, died at 382 Van Brunt in 1899. He was a member of the Allemania Lodge F. & M, the Knights of Maccabees, and the North German Brothers.

Sophie During, daughter of Alfred and Meta During married James F. McManus. Sophie McManus was living at 382 Van Brunt at the time of her death in 1902.

Hilda During did not marry.

1900: In the 1900 census Meta During was listed at 382 Van Brunt with her daughter Hilda age 26 and son, William age 16. She was operating a tobacco and stationary store. Also in the building were James McManus age 23, plumbing and hardware and Sophie Mc Manus, age 23, and Martin Hoehn age 22, bartender, and his wife Mary.

1900: Ward 6, 112 Baltic street, Paul Trede 46, porter, Dina Trede 45, Paula Trede 14, Hilda Trede 12, Henry Trede 9, Herman Trede 4,Note: Dina Trede was a sister of Meta during. The Tredes would later take over the newspaper store at 382 Van Brunt.

1902: Sophie McManus wife of James McManus and the daughter or Meta and the late Alfred During died on the 17th of May 1902, 382 Van Brunt. Buried Greenwood.

1905: 382 Van Brunt, two family, Meta During 60, cigars and papers, Hilda During 31, daughter, William During 21, son, bank clerk, James F Mcmanus 28, lodger, plumbing

1910: 382 Van Brunt, two family, Myra H During 65, cagar and candy, Hilda R During 35, William A During 26,, printer NY Press

1915: Meta and Hilda During were living in Saugerties, Ulster County, New York.

1920: 382 Van Brunt, Paul Tride 66, news dealer, born Germany, Dina Tride 63, born Germany, Paula Tride 32, Henry Tride 28, dealer, store, Herman Tride 24, clerk office, children all born New York.

1920: Meta During died September 5, 1920 at her home in Saugerties, N. Y. Her funeral service was held at the residence of her sister, Mrs. P. J. Trede, 382 Van Brunt. She was buried in Greenwood.

1925: The Trede family was still at 382 Van Brunt with Hilda listed as the store keeper. Paul Trede 71, Dina Trede 69, Hilda Trede 37, Henry Trede 34, Heman Trede 29

1930: In 1930 Hilda during was rooming at the residence of Frederick Finkeldey.

1930: Two family, 382 Van Brunt, Paul J Trede 67, store keeper stationary, Dina Trede 65, Herman Trede 35, clerk cement co.. Own $7,000. Also in the building were their daughter, Hilda "Steinhower" and her husband, William renting at $16 a month.

1938: June 4, Paul J Trede the husband of Dina Trede died at his home at 382 Van Brunt. He was survived by his widow and three children, Paula Meyer, Hilda Steinhauer and Herman Trede. Buried Greenwood.

1939: May 20, Dina Trede (nee De Groot), died, residence 382 Van Brunt. mother of Mrs. Frank J. Meyer, Mrs. John W Steinhauer and Herman Trede. sister of Mrs. John Hansen. Buried Greenwood.

1940: 382 Van Brunt, Head John W Steinhauer 65, Wife Hilda Steinhauer 52, Brother-in-law Herman Trede 44

1942: In 1942 William During was living in Newark, N. J.

Hilda and William Trete died in the mid 1950s.


399 Van Brunt

There was a saloon at 399 Van Brunt as early as 1870. See 1870 Liquor List Red Hook

The 1899 Trow's Business directory lists a Chinese Laundry at 399 Van Brunt.

In 1904 Sam Wah Laundry was at 399 Van Brunt. (Annual Report of the Commissioner of Labor, Part 2 By New York (State). Dept. of Labor)


401 Van Brunt

1888: A fire at 401 Van Brunt, a two story frame house, occupied by Otto Smith, was caused by a defective flue. The flames were quickly extinguished and little damage was done. Bt 1906 401 Van Brunt was described as a three story brick with a store on the first floor and two floors above.

1899: Cocurello, Frank 401 Van Brunt boot and shoe maker, Trow's Business Directory.

1901: 401 Van Brunt listed as a shoe shop.

1903: In March 1903 Carlo (Charles) Rappatelli (Rappertello), age 22 a barber at 401 Van Brunt, (while he was in the middle of shaving a man) was arrested by the Red Hook police for felonious assault on the complaint of Pietro (or Guiseppi Dominco) Sansoni who was by then the husband of Rappatelli's mother. It was claimed that in June 1898 Carlo Rappatelli and two friends attacked Sansoni when he was visiting Mrs. Rappatelli. They stabbed him in the back, neck and abdomen, and shot him in the right leg. As a result Sansoni's leg was amputated. The young Rappatelli fled to Italy in 1899 but returned in 1903. Rappatelli was brought to court in March 1903 but Sansoni failed to appear as a witness.

1906: In April 1906 at 9:50 (or eleven) at night a gas pipe bomb wrecked the barber shop of Peter (Pedro) Samperi at 401 Van Brunt. Windows were blown out of 401, the neighboring saloon, building across the street and buildings around the corner. Four of the Samperi family (who were in a back room) were knocked off their chairs. Mrs Kane and her six children, who lived above the barber shop, ran panic stricken into the street. Having heard the explosion the neighbors also poured out of their homes.

The police theorized that business jealousy was the motive. Four people were injured. Two of them were the reputed bomb throwers.

Pietro Samperi and others chased the two men through the streets of Red Hook. Gun shots were fired by both sides.

Peter Samperi a "young athletic Italian" and his brother, Antonio, had established a well patronized shop with steady customers. A week before the bombing someone had opened the door to the shop and fired three shots. Samperi insisted that he did not have a clue who was after him. He maintained to the police that no one had threatened him or his bother. The police discovered that a competitor of Samperi had tried to buy the building that housed Samperi's shop but the owner, Joseph Kane who lived upstairs, had refused to sell. The culprits were though to be the Campione (AKA Canada) family who had a competing barber shop on another block in the neighborhood. The names of the suspects vary WILDLY in the reportage. However, in April 1906 the names were given in the Brooklyn Eagle as Manuel Valenti 25, 51 Luquer street and Rosario Canada 17 of Manhattan. When they were caught and brought to the Police Station about forty cartridges were found on "Canada" and about twenty on Valenti. Valenti's face was full of powder and his jacket was burned. Canada's left hand was burned.

Pietro Samperi was also arrested and charged with possession of a revolver.

The only witness the police had was John Crawford 17 of 171 Breard street who initially failed to show in court. It was stated that Crawford was induced to stay away from the court by Italian friends of the accused. With no witness it was feared the case would peter out. Valenti, however, was held by the grand jury for shooting two bullets at David McGrath, age 24, one of those pursuing Valenti and Canada after the bombing. The shots were fired at close range and two bullets went through McGrath's hat.

By April 13, John Crawford was located in Boston. He appeared in court on April 13 at the arraignment of Valenti and Canada.

On May 15, 1906 Emanuel Valente, 25, of 51 "Luqueer" street and Rosario "Canata", 16 of 47 Bedford street, Manhattan "were quickly found guilty" by a jury. The maximun penalty was ten years.

The story was carried by the New York Times and as far away as Los Angeles.

1910: John Attansio, age 27 of 401 Van Brunt a blind Italian vender of penny ice creams*, claimed he was assaulted and robbed of a dollar in change by a well dressed blond female named Margaret Miller who worked in a cigar store at 49 Hamilton ave. Attansio recognized his assailant by her voice. Margaret denied the charges.

*Or a salesman for a tea house.

Joseph Kane

1905: 401 Van Brunt: Kane, Joseph, age 56, Ireland, customs house, Mary wife, age 36, Joseph son age 26, Daniel son age 11, Henry son 8 Helen daughter 6, Ethel daughter 4

The Samperis were not listed at 401 in 1905

At 403 Van Brunt, Frank, Albert, 32 born Germany, saloon, May wife 36 born Germany, Pauline daughter 12, John son 7, Albert 6 months

Peter and Anthony Samperi

1910: Ward 12, Brooklyn, 401 Van Brunt, (172) Peter Sampere 27, married 4 years, born Italy, immigrated 1901, barber, Dartana [?] wife 2 children 0 living immigrated 1905, (173) Anthony Samperi 25, barber, born Italy immigrated 1902, Santene Sampere 21, two children 1 living, born Italy immigrated 1905, Caladona Sampere 2. There was another Italian barber living in the same building.


Brooklyn Daily Eagle April 5, 1906

From left to right 399 (Chinese Laundry, 401 (Italian Barber shop) and 403 (German Saloon) Van Brunt. None of these buildings are still standing.

1903: February 28, 1903 Charles (Carlo) Rappertello age 22 an Italian barber working at 401 Van Brunt was arrested while shaving a man. He was charged with felonious assault. He had recently retuned from Italy where he had fled four years earlier. It was alleged that in June 1899 Rappertello shot Guiseppi Dominco in the leg. Dominico's leg had to be amputated. Another version of this story says the victim was Pietro Sansoni. Either way is was stated that the victim had a relationship with Carol Rappertello's mother and that Carlo did not approve.

1910: John Attansio (Attanson)age 27 a blind ice cream vender who lived at 401 Van Brunt street was robbed by a woman who choked him and stole a dollar. Attansio identified her by her voice. Attansio had gone to the cigar store at 387 Van brunt to buy a packet of cigarettes. Margaret Miller, who worked in the store, grabbed him by the throat and took three twenty five cent pieces and five five cents pieces form Attansio's pocket and then shoved him out the door. There was a witness to his being thrown out of the store. Margaret Miller claimed that Attansio begged the cigarettes for free because he was blind and she gave them to him.


403 Van Brunt

1872: August Stuve was at 403 Van Brunt in 1872. See Stuve

1890: Kroge, Henry V 403 Van Brunt, Grocery (Lain's Business Directory of Brooklyn, Kings County, Long Island City)

1899: Sprissler, Mary 403 Van Brunt, wines, liquors and lager beer (Trow's Business Directory of the Boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens)

1902: In 1902 403 Van Brunt was described as a four story brick.

1907: The Albert Frank Cafe was located at 403 Van Brunt.

1914: Frankenberg, Albert, 403 Van Brunt Liquor (Annual Report of the State Commissioner of Excise, Volume 2 By New York (State). Dept. of Excise)


436 Van Brunt

1874: James D Kanergaren a saloon keeper at 436 Van Brunt was arrested for violation of the Excise Law.

1898: In action of Mary B Clark, against Philip R Connell 436 Van Brunt street, lot 25x90 to G. S. Espencheid for $1,400

1899: 436 Van brunt For Sale $150 light manufacturing business "fine choice for live man"


Campione, Pietro

Birth: Circa 1887 Villa Franca, Sicily, Italy

Marriage: Annunciata/Anna

Children:

  1. Mariano

    1900: Mariono Campione Arrival Date: 16 Mar 1900 Birth Date: abt 1896 Age: 4 Gender: Male Ethnicity/ Nationality: Italian Port of Departure: Palermo, Italy Port of Arrival: New York, New York Ship Name: Marco Minghetti

    WWI: Mariano Campione, age 22, 436 Van brunt, born April 22, 1895, Villa Franca Italy, barber, singel

    WWII: Mariano Campione Birth Date: 22 Apr 1895 Birth Place: Villa Franca, Italy Residence: Brooklyn, New York, USA Race: White Mariano Campione SSN: 094-26-5532 Last Residence: 11210 Brooklyn, Kings, New York, USA BORN: 22 Apr 1895 Died: Jan 1976

    Mariano Campione Birth Date: 22 Mar 1898 Death Date: 19 Jan 1976 Cemetery: Long Island National Cemetery Burial or Cremation Place: East Farmingdale, Suffolk County, New York, USA

  2. Marie

  3. Vita (Mamie)

  4. Rose

  5. Lucy

  6. Cecilia

  7. Frank

    Frank Campione SSN: 098-10-5807 Last Residence: 11215 Brooklyn, Kings, New York, USA BORN: 14 Dec 1906 Died: Mar 1974
1900: Immigration of Anna Maninalro, age 23, married, and her two children Mariano age 4, and Marie age 2, all born Villa Franca, S. s. M. Minghetti, from Palermo to New York 16 Mar 1900

1906:

In April 1906 at 9:50 (or eleven) at night a gas pipe bomb wrecked the barber shop of Peter (Pedro) Samperi at 401 Van Brunt. Windows were blown out of 401, the neighboring saloon, building across the street and buildings around the corner. Four of the Samperi family (who were in a back room) were knocked off their chairs. Mrs Kane and her six children, who lived above the barber shop, ran panic stricken into the street. Having heard the explosion the neighbors also poured out of their homes. The police theorized that business jealousy was the motive. Four people were injured. Two of them were the reputed bomb throwers.

Pietro Samperi and others chased the two men through the streets of Red Hook. Gun shots were fired by both sides.

Peter Samperi a "young athletic Italian" and his brother, Antonio, had established a well patronized shop with steady customers. A week before the bombing someone had opened the door to the shop and fired three shots. Samperi insisted that he did not have a clue who was after him. He maintained to the police that no one had threatened him or his bother. The police discovered that a competitor of Samperi had tried to buy the building that housed Samperi's shop but the owner, Joseph Kane who lived upstairs, had refused to sell. The culprits were though to be the Campione (AKA Canada) family who had a competing barber shop on another block in the neighborhood. The names of the suspects vary WILDLY in the reportage. However, in April 1906 the names were given in the Brooklyn Eagle as Manuel Valenti 25, 51 Luquer street and Rosario Canada 17 of Manhattan. When they were caught and brought to the Police Station about forty cartridges were found on "Canada" and about twenty on Valenti. Valenti's face was full of powder and his jacket was burned. Canada's left hand was burned.

Pietro Samperi was also arrested and charged with possession of a revolver.

The only witness the police had was John Crawford 17 of 171 Breard street who initially failed to show in court. It was stated that Crawford was induced to stay away from the court by Italian friends of the accused. With no witness it was feared the case would peter out. Valenti, however, was held by the grand jury for shooting two bullets at David McGrath, age 24, one of those pursuing Valenti and Canada after the bombing. The shots were fired at close range and two bullets went through McGrath's hat.

By April 13, John Crawford was located in Boston. He appeared in court on April 13 at the arraignment of Valenti and Canada.

On May 15, 1906 Emanuel Valente, 25, of 51 "Luqueer" street and Rosario "Canata", 16 of 47 Bedford street, Manhattan "were quickly found guilty" by a jury. The maximun penalty was ten years.

The story was carried by the New York Times and as far away as Los Angeles.

1906: April 4, Another article on the story listed "Pietro Pomperio's" barber shop at 436 Van Brunt. It was said that someone fired three shots into this shop. 1913: 346 Van Brunt fire damage to building slight.

1915: Van Brunt, Peter Campione 41, barber, Nellie Campione 39 "Mortimer" Campione 20, barber, Mary Campione 17, teacher helper, "Vera" Campione 13, Rosalia Campione 12, Lucy Campione 11, Amelia Campione 9, Frank Campione 8

1920: 436 Van Brunt street, Brooklyn, Peter Campinoe 44, barber, Anna Campinoe 40, Mariano Campinoe 24, barber, Vita Campinoe 18, stenographer, steam ship co, Rosalier Campinoe 17, clerical steam ship co., Lucy Campinoe 16 Cecelia Campinoe 13 Frank Campinoe 12

1920 Petition for Naturalization: Pietro Campione, 436 Van Brunt, barber, born April 1875, Vellfranca (Villa Franca), Italy, Immigrated from Naples 1 October 1898 on the Burgandia, wife Anna born 10 April "1899" (1879?) at Vellfranca,Italy, children, Mariano born April 21 1895, Italy, Mary, September 25, 1897 Italy, Vita born J--- 22, 1898, New York, Rose, December 15, 1903 NY, Lucy, July 28 1904 NY, Cecilia, 2Sept 2, 1904, Frank, Frank December 14, 1906

1925: Van Brunt street, Peter Campioni 51, own business, "Nellie" Campioni 49, Marionea Campioni 30, naturalized 1915 Camp Upton, barber, Mary Campioni 23, clerk, Rose Campioni 21, clerk, Frances Campioni 19, clerk Frank Campioni 18, factory

1925: Peter "Campanio" 436 Van Brunt Street was listed as a third district voter.

1930: 436 Van Brunt, own, value 7,500, Pietro Campione 53, barber, working on own account, naturalized, Italian, immigration 1920, Anna Campione 50, Vita Campione 25, daughter, born New York, Frank Campione 22, son, born New York, next to them, Campione, Mariano, head, age 29,, rent 40, born Italy, barber, Josephine, wife 18, born New York, Peter, son age 1 - just those tow families listed at his address.

1940: 436 Van Brunt, Peter Campione 64, barber, own, vale 6,500, elementary school 4th grade, Anna Campione 64 Mamie Vita Campione 39

1940: 436 Van Brunt, Marion Campione 43, barber, Josephine Campione 35, Peter Campione 11, Mary Campione 5, Michael Campione 2

1942: WW II Draft Registration, Mariano Campione, Birth Date: 22 Apr 1895, Birth Place: Villa Franca, Italy, 436 Van brunt, Brooklyn, New York, USA Wife, Josephine


Photo shared by James Dipersia, January 2016

James says:

The lady on the right Mamie (Vita), man on her right Mariano, lady on his, right Rose, below Rose is Mary, on Mary's right my Grandmother Lucille man in center is Pietro."

Photo shared by James Dipersia, January 2016 - Annunciata Campione


Photo shared by James Dipersia, January 2016 - Pietro Campione

James wrote:

My great grandfather Pietro Campione had a Barber shop at 436 Van Brunt st. He also bought some of the adjacent buildings. He came here in 1887 and died in 1965. I remember the hall walls being curved and could not get the player piano out of the apartment - it must have been hoisted. He lived there till his death with his dghter Mamie (Vita) - she stayed there on VanBrunt till her death. She never left the house. She would put money on a string and let it down out the window so one of the kids in the neighborhood could buy her food. I see those buildings were taken down."
See 401 Van Brunt above.

See also Kuhn


Imlay Street

Imlay street runs for four blocks between Hamilton and Williams (now Pioneer). By all accounts a tough four blocks.

1871: Imlay street between Hamilton and commerce was scheduled for repaving.

1872: A fight on Imlay street near Verona ended when one man stabbed another in the face with a pocket knife.

1872: "Michael Cavanagh, a dissipated youth, was found this morning lying in Imlay street near Summit suffering from a cut on the head, which is supposed he received by falling while drunk."

1876: James Horrohue, "a well known South Brooklyn loafer" was found "drunk and disorderly" on Hamilton Avenue near Imlay street. When an officer attempted to arrest him, Horrohue attached the officer.

1877: William Thompson, a watchman at the Woodruff and McLean stores, was charged in the murder of George McBride. Thompson and McBride were on Imlay street, near Commerce, discussing the election between O'Reilly and Donovan when the discussion escalated into an argument. McBride called Thompson a "North of Ireland Orange Dog" - Thompson was a Protestant from the north of Ireland. Thompson left and McBride and two other men followed him. Thompson fearing for his life and thinking his gun contained blanks fired at McBride. Thompson testified that he had consumed three glasses of "strong liquor" and two glasses of ale during the day but was not intoxicated at the time of the incident. Some of the witnesses in the case had been at the saloon "on the corner of the street". Imlay street was described as a dark and desolate place with flickering lights. Commerce street was described "with not a light between Imlay street and the river on Commerce street" and "no dwellings only warehouses". It was a freezing cold night and Thompson was wearing three "coats", three vests, two pairs of pants, drawers and overshoes. Thompson was acquitted on the grounds of self defense.

1878: Complaints were sworn against Thomas S Gunderson of No 121 Imlay and Henry Brown of No 131 Imlay for running sailor's boarding houses without a license.

1879: A man struck another with a base ball bat during a fight at 126 Imlay. They were intoxicated and no charges were pressed.

1879: A runner for a sailor's boarding house on Imlay street was charged with boarding a vessel in the Atlantic Basin and carrying off luggage. He got 25 days in jail.

Note: Immediately upon his arrival the immigrant was besieged by all sorts of scam artists and thieves who robbed luggage, sold phony tickets to points west and generally made live miserable for the immigrant. These men were called "runners".
1879: An intoxicate Irishman living at 103 Imlay accosted a police officer in the street near his home. The officer hit him with his club and brought him to "terms".

1880: A concerned citizen asked for more light on Imaly street because it was an unsafe area "frequented by a class of roughs".

1881: Hugh Masterson died and left a property on Imlay street near Verona valued at $3,000.

1883: Michael Milton of 97 Imlay stole his friend's watch and chain worth $100.

1884: FOUND IN IMLAY STREET the body of unknown, male about 20 slim build, 6 ft 6 inches, dark short hair, small dark mustache, dark coat, pants and vest, blue and white checked jumper, red undershirt, white cotton drawers, mixed grey stockings, congress gaiters.

1886: Two 15 year old boys got into a fight at 105 Imaly. Two older brothers of one of the boys intervened resulting in the stabbing of one of the 15 year olds. "The young men eluded arrest".

1887: Lizzie, the five month old daughter of Mrs. Mary Fitzpatrick who lived in the cellar at 97 Imlay street, died of neglect.

1887: Inlay street started "its shady career at the south side of Hamilton avenue, just above Atlantic Basin" and pursued "its sinister course in a southwesterly direction until Williams street" The street were paved with cobblestones and the houses were "three story brick". The tenants were familiar with the growler; the can that was used to send to the saloon for beer or ale. Every Sunday was the occasion for a fight "of the liveliest possible character". The houses had perviously been used as sailor's lodgings. "The place was then know as "Hell's Half Acre"". By 1887 it appears to have been inhabited by families of Irish and was called the "Back Block" by the police. It was the supposed home of Mrs. Fitzpatrick and her children, her mother Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Milton (a truckman), "Bubbles" (Samuel) Slattery, Mrs. Mary Ann Murphy, (the queen of the block, aka "the Crosse Eyed Boss of the Little Tin Growler"), Tommy Mooney (the king of the block), Aleck Mcdonald (a Scotsman), and "Whitely" Keating (whose name frequently "adorned" the police blotter).

Tommy Mooney composed the following ditty:

There's a light in the window,
A can in the hall;
There's ten cents te fill it,
And we'll all have a ball.

1887: William Baker and Stonewall Jackson, two young thieves who lived on the Back Block, stole five bags of sugar worth $35 and hid it at 105 Imlay.

1887: Mrs. Ellen Ryan and Mrs. Dowling of 131 Imlay got into an argument when Mrs. Ryan's billy goat blocked the passage of Mrs. Dowling as she came down the stairway to the front door.

1887: There was a confrontation between an Italian rag picker and "a valiant Irishman" dring which the Italian hit the Irishman with a iron bar. The Italian "said to be a desperate character" did not live on Imlay St. but was only passing through.

1888: During a fight between a husband and wife the husband fell against a key in a door resulting in a laceration over his eye.

1887: Caecar Vazzler, a chandler, who had a business on Imlay street near Hamilton was arrested for smuggling liquor. Vazzler was an Italian whose store was frequented "by members of the Italian colony" and who dealt in "all sorts of supplies, the cheap wines of Itlay and Spain and West Indian rum, forming important features" of his business.

1887: Mr. H. F. Sammis proposed to take out the front foundation walls of 99, 101 and 103 Imlay street and rebuild with brick to the first floor - cost $500. (These buildings were show as brick in the 1886 map)

1888: James Shea, a 50 year old junkman living at 99 Imlay, fell while securing his boat at South Central Pier and fractured his leg.

1889: Caesar Velli an Italian had a grocery store at 11 Imlay street.

1889: John Reynolds of 101 Imlay street stole a barrel of pork from a packing house.

1889: A woman accused another of using "vile and abusive language toward her in the street, in the presence of a number of people".

1889: Patrick Kearney, an ex-member of the mounted police square, was discharged by the Commissioner for assaulting a woman. Several months later he was in trouble for starting a fight with James Shea, age 60 of 105 Imlay, at James Connell's liquor store at 131 Imlay. Kearney jumped on Shea, knocked him down, pounded on him and broke several ribs.

1890 A husband struck his wife with a tin can during a quarrel at 103 Imlay.

1890: When police tried to intervene in a fight between a burly Swede and his wife the Swede turned on the police and tore the shield form the officer's coat, knocked him down the stairs and into the street. Another officer came to the rescue and between the two officers they succeeded in subduing the Swede and taking him off to jail where he was charged with intoxication.

1895: A three story brick dwelling 17x90 for sale at 149 Imlay street

1897: W. C. Bloomingdale was a feed dealer at 113(8?) Imlay street.

In 1886 Imlay was bonded on the west side by commercial warehouses. Between Summit and Bowne on the east side was and iron foundry and a lumber yard. Between Bowne and Commerce was the Richardson and Boynton stove company. Between Commerce and Verona were three wood frame and 5 brick dwellings. There were at least 10 vacant lots in this block. Between Verona and Williams (Pioneer) were several vacant lots, Eagleton Spring works, five brick dwellings and another iron works.

The 1870 Liquor license list included five establishments on Imlay:

  1. M Flinn at Summit and Imlay

  2. R. Meyers and Imlay and Bowne

  3. J Malloy at Imlay near Ewer

  4. J. Knoop at Imlay and Commerce

  5. T. Little at Imlay near Williams

  6. The First three were near Hamilton Ave.
See Knoop, Little, Molloy and Red Hook Liquor stores mid to late 1800s

In the winter of 1872 Jacob Knoop, who owned the liquor store and Imlay and Commerce and was somewhat of a recluse, died of natural causes. No one appears to have missed him and when his body was discovered several weeks later it had been largely eaten by his dog.

In the 1875 Census Thomas Doran age 35 born Ireland, with a liquor store at 97 Imlay, James Conahan, age 35 born Ireland, with a liquor store at 109 Commerce (corner of Imlay and Commerce) and John Molloy age 54, born Ireland with a liquor store at 121 Imlay.

On the 1898-99 map there was a wood frame building at 93 Imlay near the south east corner of Imlay and a wood frame building at 109 Commerce at the corner of Imlay and Commerce. It 1886 map is unclear at this corner.


Richards Street


206 Richards Street

Photo Maggie Blanck

Pictured above: 206 Richard Street, Red Hook, Brooklyn, 2003.

The 1886 birth certificate of Maria Kettler, the daughter of Fritz Kettler and Hannah Peters, gives the place of birth as 206 Richards Street. 206 Richards street is midway in the block between Dikeman and Partition (Coffey). The 1886 map shows a wooden frame building at 206 Richards.

See Fritz Kettler - Hannah Peters Kettler Jensen - Gertrude Kettler Blanck

The 1880 United States Federal Census listed addresses. There were five "families" at 206 Richards street:

  1. Buse, Frederick, age 43, peddle books, Catherine, wife, age 41, candy, cigar store, Henry son age 16 learning "segar" business, Elizabeth age 14, daughter "lives out", Annie age 12, school, Frederick son age 9 school, Catherine daughter age 7 school, Dora daughter age 3, parents born Hanover, children born New York.

    Frederick Buse was listed in 1877 Brooklyn directory at 217 Conover street, peddler, in the 1879-1881 directory at 206 Richards Street, under cigar dealers and manufacturers, and in the 1886 directory on Van Brunt, cigars.

    1900: Ward 12, 392 Van Brunt, Catherine Buse 61 widow, Fred Buse 28, house furnishing goods, Dorothy Buse 23, Catherine Van Bebern 14, grand daughter, Lillie Van Bebern 12, grand daughter

    Frederick Buse, born July 23, 1837 died Sept 25, 1887, Elizabeth Bebern, born Aug 5, 1885, died Aug 20, 1890, Catherine Buse bron Feb 20, 1839 died April 22, 1927

    Frederick Van Buse was listed at 206 Richards in 1882. He was listed between 1886 and 1890 at 408 Van Brunt, cigars.

  2. Brown, Jeremiah, age 32, laborer, born Ireland, Mary wife age 26, keeps house, born Ireland, Mary daughter age 9, born Ireland, Edward, son age 7, born Ireland, Thomas, son age 5, born New York, Jeremiah son age 5 months born New York

    1881 Directory Jeremiah Brown 206 Richards, laborer.

  3. Lane, Nicholas age 34 laborer, Margaret, wife age 42, keeps house Nicholas Jr. age 11

    1881 Directory Nicholas Land 206 Richards Street.

    Listed in Ward 17 in 1892 census, laborer.

  4. Robinson, John, age 33, car driver, Anne wife, age 29, keeps house

    NOT listed at 205 Richards in 1886

  5. "Crayne", Michael age 58 nothing entered under occupation, born Ireland (This must be Michael "Graham", who sold the property in 1880 to Henry Rugge.)

    Interestingly Henry Rugge was also a cigar maker and had a store on Van Brunt.

Note: It does not appear that any of the families listed at 206 Richards in 1880 were still there at the birth of Marie Kettler in 1886.

1870 Census Ward 12, no address, "Greham" Michael age 45, laborer, $1,000, born Ireland, Mary, 35 keeping house born Ireland. In the same building were:

  1. Dayes, John age 33, laborer, born Ireland and his wife, Anne age 30 also born Ireland

  2. Lynch, Thomas 25, laborer born NY, Mary 30, born Ireland, Catherine age 3, James age 4 months both born NY.
Note: I am pretty sure this is 206 Richard[s]. The next door neighbors was McManons who were known to be at 204 Richard[s].

1872 to 1881: Graham, Michael, liquors, 206 Richards

1878: Complaints against liquor dealers, violators of the excise laws, Michael Graham, 206 Richard Street

1880: Real Estate Transfers Richard street, n. w. s. 80 ft n e Partition st 20x30 Michael Graham to Henry Rugge,

1886: The Engineering Record, Building Record and Sanitary Engineer, Volume 14 edited by Charles Frederick Wingate, Henry C. Meyer - "Partition st - s So w Richard st 4 story fr ten; cost $5,000 - Henry Rugge 206 Richard st."

1888: An 18 year old German girl who lived at 206 Richards was seeking work tending a candy store or bakery. Address 206 Richards, Second floor.

1892: State Census: No addresses, Ward 12, Rugge, 34, manuf, Minnie 29, Herman 21, Henry 2

1900: Ward 12, 206 Richards Henry Rugge 41, Feb 1859, age 41, married 13 years, 1 child living, immigrated, 1873, naturalized, cigar maker, Filliemena Rugge 38, Henry Rugge 10

Also at 206 in 1900 were: Lehnbeck, Henry, age 34 born Germany, driver, Lottie his wife and John their son age 7 months, and Hennkind, Adolf, brother, Annealia [sp?] sister, olive packer

1903: 72 Coffey and 206 Richards St. Two buildings and stores; good location for saloon business; belong to estate and must be sold price $5,200. (Brooklyn Standard Union)

1912: The home of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rugge at "216" Richards street presented a brillant appearance Wednesday evening Feb 28, when they celebrated they silver wedding."

A musical was given and a "collation" was served at 12:30. They received many "beautiful" presents including a silver loving cup from their son, Henry.

1915: State Census, 206 Richard, only Henry, cigar mfg., Minnie and son "John", age 25, letter carrier

1915: Henry J Rugge, Jr. was at 206 Richard in 1915.

1917: Henry Rugge lived at 206 Richard Street when he was called into the army.

1919: Board of Elections Republican Henry Rugge, 206 Richard street

1920: 206 Richard street, Rugge, Henry own, age 61, immigrated 1872, naturalized 1877, born Hanover, Germany, cigar maker, cigar store, Wilhelmina, age 57, wife, same immigration, born Hanover, Rugge, Henry rent age 30 born New York, letter carrier, U. S. Government, Henritte, wife age 29 born New Jersey, Henry age 3 and George age 1

Henry Rugge was listed as a cigar maker in Brooklyn in the 1880 schedule of cigar makers. In 1879, 1881, 1882, 1885 his business was at 428 Van Brunt - Tobacconist - Cigars, no home address given.

In 1889 and 1890 his home address was 206 Richards. His business address was still 428 Van Brunt.

1928:

Henry RUGGE--an old resident of the 12th ward, died Thursday at his home, Catherine Avenue, Franklin Square. He was born in Germany 71 years ago and was engaged in the manufacture of cigars for 55 years. He is survived by his widow, Wilhelmina VOIGT-RUGGE; a son, Henry; two sisters, Mrs. Elizabeth ROHRS of Belleville, NJ and Mrs. Anna ROSEBROCH of Germany and a brother, Herman. The funeral services will be held at his late home, at 2:30 PM, Monday. The Reverend Dr. Harry G. CORIELS will officiate. Interment at Lutheran Cemetery, under direction of Shufelt and Strobel, 384 Van Brunt Street.

1937: Wilhlemina Rugge of 206 Richards street, president of the Ladies Aid Society of St. Paul's Lutheran Church d of which she was a member for 52 years, died at her home she was born in Germany and lived in Brooklyn for 59 years. Survived by her son, John Henry Rugge and two grandchildren.

The Rugge tombstone is engraved in German and lists Henry Rugge born 29 Mar 1857 died 3 May 1928 Wilhelmina M Rugge born Voigt, born 12 Aug 1861 died 26 Jan 1937 and Dora Rugge born Schlumbohm 16 Dec 1855 died 30 Dec 1885, Lutheran All Faiths

1943: H. J. Rugge of 206 Richards Street graduated from the navigational school of Hondo, Texas in January 1943.

1922:

Death: Dare - Mrs. Geraldine Dare widow of James W Dare and mother of James W and William, age 81, Feb. 16, 1922. Funeral from her late residence 206 Richard Street, Brooklyn

She was living with her son, William, Brooklyn Assembly District 17, Kings, New York Quincy Street in 1920 and in 1915. She had no apparent earlier connection to Richards Street.

1930: 206 Richards st.,
  1. "Seeney", Daniel, head rent, $25, age 52 born Ireland, imm 1889, Iron Worker, ship yard, Catherine, wife, age 52, born New York, Loretta daughter age 18, born New York, no occupation

  2. Rugge, Henry head rent, 25, age 40, born New York, inspector insurance, Harriett, wife 40, Henry son 14, George son 11,

  3. Rosen, Harry, head, rent $85, age 52, Yiddish, born Russia, imm. 1908, store owner, -ise, wife 42, born Russia, imm 1901, Saddie daughter age 15, boen New York cashier, Moving Pictures

Note: They all say they were renting. The building was owned by Wilhelmina Rugge -

Sept 22, 1928 - The will of Henry Rugge was written 36 years before his death. It named two uncles, who died before Henry, as trustees. Wilhelmine Rugge petitioned the court to receive all personal effects including diamonds and other jewels. $5,000 was set aside for the education and maintenance of Henry Rugge Jr. until 21 "when he was to have received that amount outright and incomes with it. The widow gets the residue" (BE).

1940: 206 Richards street,

  1. Rosen, Harry, head age 65, store owner retail clothing, Gussie, wife, age 52, both born Russia

  2. Rugge, John Henry, 50, own $7,500, Harriet wife, 49, inspector insurance, Henry John 24, general helper bank, George William 21, office boy business office, banking

  3. Note Ancestry.com gives the address as Dikeman street but it is Richards street.

1931: Obituaries Brooklyn Standard Union July 11, 1931

Catherine SEENEY died Thursday at her home, 206 Richards street. She is survived by her husband Daniel, and two daughters, Mrs. Matthew FOLEY, and Loretta SEENEY, and one sister, Mrs. E. KELLY. The funeral will be held at 9:30 A.M. Monday with requiem mass at the Church of the Visitation. Interment will be at St. John's Cemetery under direction of Joseph REDMOND, 103 King street.

In 1871 Catherine "Sweeney" of 206 Richards Street charged Richard Devoe of the same address of assaulting her son age 9. Devoe threatened to shoot "Sweeney".

1910: The Seeney family was at 34 Wolcott street.

1925: Richards Street. No number. Iron worker.

1930: 206 Richards st., Daniel Seeney 52 Catherine Seeney 52 Lorretta Seeney 18 1940: Theodore Eckhoff 32, Loretta Eckhoff 28, Daniel Seeney 65, father in law 14th street.

1941 Death: Daniel W. Seeney, April 14, 1941. father of Mrs. Theodore Echoff, Mrs. John Able, and William and Harold. Mass Visitation.

Henry J Rugge died in 1945, Harriet Rugge died in 1965, George Rugge died in 1978.

The neighbors on Richards Street in the 1880 census

There were 9 dwellings listed on pages 26, 27 and 28 in the 1880 census in Ward 12 Ed 097 between 176 and 206 Richards Street. This includes ONLY the west side of the street and represents the two blocks between Wolcott and Partition (Coffey). The 1886 map indicates that these were wooden houses - three clustered in the middle of the block between Partition and Dikeman and 6 clustered near the corner of Wolcott. There were 18 families and 94 people living in these 9 houses. One address (no. 184) had both a front and rear building.

The Federal Census was taken in the 97th ED of Brooklyn on June 11, 1880. It showed:

  1. At 176 one family - head of household, sister and mother
  2. At 178 two families - heads of household, wives and children
  3. At 180 one family - husband and wife
  4. At 182 one family - husband, wife and children
  5. At 184 four families front and rear buildings - husbands, wives and children
  6. At 186 one family - husband wife and children
  7. At 202 one family - husband, wife, children, aunt, uncle and nephew
  8. At 204 two families - husbands, wives, and children
  9. At 206 5 families - 3 with husbands, wives and children, one married couple and one single man.
All the wives were "Keeping house" except one having a cigar candy store. All the school age children were "at school". There were no servants. All of the adults and children over 16 were employed. Occupations included: 1 "on tug boat", 2 tug captains, 1 saloon keeper, 1 stevedore, 1 engineer, 7 laborers, 1 book folder, 2 packing box makers, 1 book peddler, 1 candy cigar store owner (a woman) , 1 lighterman, 2 longshore men, 1 cigar makers apprentice, 2 tin smiths, 1 waiter, 3 car drivers.

There were 94 people listed. Places of birth included: Hanover 3, Ireland, 29, New York 52, Germany 4, Prussia 1, England 3 Bremen 1 Norway 1. The overwhelming majority of those born in New York had parents born abroad.

Liquor Store between Dikeman and Partition in 1866

A robbery occurred in November 1866 at a liquore store owned by Philip H. Farley and located on Richards street between Dikeman and Partition streets. No address was give and the news article does not give the side of the street.

$1,120 was reported stolen from Philip H Farley by John Walsh and Francis Walsh. Philip H. Farley occupied the back room "adjoining the hall" on the same flore as the liquor store. He went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock. He had nine $100 Treasury notes, two British half sovereigns, between $200 and $300 in small bills and coins, and a set of gold studs. He wrapped the money and studs in paper and put the package in his pants pocket. He placed his pants under his pillow and went to bed. When he awoke in the morning he discovered that the locked room had been entered through the window, his pants with the money and studs was missing, and a box of cigars had been taken from under the barroom counter. Farley claimed he had made "considerable" money in California. Upon his return to Brooklyn in June he rented the "premises" and set up a liquor store.

Margaret Bahan, who occupied the front room over the store, testified that she heard "tramps in the hall" about two thirty in the morning. She took a look and saw John Walsh (or Welsh) and Thomas Shanley and heard them "working at the window". Walsh knocked on her door and said he was Michael Bahan. Then he went away but she saw him from her window. John Walsh said he was 38 years old, born in Ireland, and lived on Richards street, occupation "speculatore" and Junk Dealer. He pleaded not guilty. Walsh and Farley were both said to have been intoxicated.

The 1870 and 1871 directories list Farley, John, carman h[ome] Richards c[orner] Dikeman.

1870 census: Ward 12, no address, Farley, John, age 43, carman, born Ireland, Anne 33, born Ireland, Francis 10, born Ga. Thomas 9, bron Ga. Alice 7 born Ga., Margaret 3, born NY.

The neighbors on Richards Street in the news

A fire broke out in a two story frame building at 202 Richards in September 1881 owned by Henry Sorensen. The damage was about $200 and was covered by insurance (Brooklyn Eagle). Listed in the 1880 censes at this address were: Ruger, Herman, waiter, age 25, born Hanover, his wife, Bertha age 27, born Bremem, and daughter Alice age 2 born New York, "Sarnssen", Henry, uncle age 33, lighterman, Aunt Annie age 46, and Henry, nephew age 3 born New York.

In March 1887 physicians were sent to check the sanity of the wife of Frederick Burr of 208 Richards Street.

In October 1886 William McMahon age 72 and long time resident of the 12th ward died at his residence at 204 Richards Street. He was "the father of Assemblyman McMahon". William McMahon age 62 was listed in the 1880 census at 204 Richards Street.

There were two families at the address in 1880:

  1. McMahon, William age 62, longshoreman, born Ireland, McMahon, James son age 35, tin smith, born NY, Cunningham, Mary, age 33 daughter keeps house, born NY, Cunningham, Patrick, age 36 son in law, car driver, born Ireland, McMahon, William son age 27, tin smith born NY

  2. Spellman, Timothy, age 38, car driver, Elizabeth, age 36, keeps house, Doyle, John age 38 boarder, car driver, Kelly, John age 30 car driver, English, William, age 38, car driver all born Ireland

In 1855 1st district of the 12th ward, Brooklyn, wood frame house, William McMahan 36, born Ireland labourer, Mary, 40 wife, born Ireland, John 11, born Kings, Mary 7 born Kings, James 5 born Kings, William 3 born Kings

1870: Ward 12, McMahon, William 52, labourer, $1,000, Mary 56, both born Ireland, John 24, labourer, William, 16, errand boy, Mary age 20, Japaner

John P McMahon was the ass't Marshall for the census. Note I am pretty sure that this was 204 Richard[s] Street as the next door neighbor was Michael "Greham" who sold 206 Richard[s] to Henry Rugge in 1880.

1876: William McMahon 204 Richards, shoemaker

James A. McMahon was a member of New York state assembly from Kings County 5th District, 1886-87.

In 1885 and ad was placed in the Brooklyn Eagle for "A Chambermaid and waitress, respectable Swedish girl with good references" at 206 (it may be 200) Richards Street.

In March 1889 G. Cunningham of 204 Richards Street passed the civil service exam for police station house doormen.

In August 1889 Mr. H. O'Brien was about to erect a three story frame (wooden) building 20x53 for five families at 211 Richards Street.

In September 1889 Peter Petersen of 202 Richards street was arrested for hitting his wife over the head with a chair while drunk.

Peter was suffering from a contused wound to the face inflicted by his brother in law, who resented the injury to his sister.

In April 1890 the one story frame house at 185 Richards Street was destroyed by fire.

On May 19, 1890 a 22 year old young German, named Richard Kospotes attempted suicide. He was a boarder with Gottlieb Schawen at 187 Richards street. Apparently Mr. Kospotes had been jilted in his native Germany and left his home to escape his sorrows. Mr. Schawen heard his boarder groaning and ran for the doctor who pumped Kospotes' stomach.

Photo Maggie Blanck, 206 Richards Street, Red Hook, Brooklyn, August 2012.


179 Richards Street - Between Dikeman and Wolcott East Side

1887: February, burglars entered Charles Wolfarth's liquor store at 179 Richards street about 2 o'clock in the morning. Apparently is was a local job as one of the perpetrators, John Dougherty, age 27, was listed as living at 179 Richards street. He was found lying "helplessly" drunk behind the bar when the police arrived. A further search found 19 year old Richard Williams in the upper hallway, also drunk. Dougherty was found to have two counterfeit half dollars, two counterfeit quarters, and one counterfeit dime in his pocket. These were said to belong to Mr. Wolfarth. In addition, three demijohns of liquor. which had been carried away by other accomplices. were found hidden in a grocery wagon at the corner of Richards and Dikeman.


181 Richards Street

Bakery in 1908 and 1911


Ferris Street

1889: A body of a six day old child was found in the water at the foot of Ferris Street.


87 Ferris

The birth certificate for Gertrude Friderike Kettler in April 1889 listed her place of birth as "87 Fery street, 12 ward". This should be "Ferris street". Frederick Kettler, laborer, was listed at the rear of 87 Ferris Street in the 1889/1890 directory. See Fritz Kettler

The 1886 map shows 9 buildings on the east side of the street between Dikeman and Partition Streets - the block that should include 87 Ferris. There were two brick dwellings at either end of the block. The other dwellings were wooden frame. At what I believe was 87 there was no dwelling shown on the street, but there was a building at the rear of the lot.

No. 85 Ferris, a wood frame building next to no. 87, was a saloon run by the Siebe family from 1867 to 1878. See Siebe. By 1880 the saloon was being operated by Charles Strichan (variety of spellings). See Saloon at 85 Ferris below. There was no liquor store at no 85 in 1900.

Between 1888 and 1892 William H Cain had a liquor store at 81 (and/or 83) Ferris. William H. Cain was born in Brooklyn circa 1856 to John and Bridget Cain both born in Ireland. William H. Cain had three brothers, Francis, John and Michael. John Sr. was a porter or car/truck driver. The family lived at various addresses in Red Hook including: 39 Dikeman in 1879, 82 Partition in 1884, and 357 Van Brunt in 1888. William Cain age 35, liquors Annie 25, Thomas 4, William 3 John 2 and Michael 27, barkeeper were listed in Ward 12 ED 1 in the 1892 census, no address listed.

John C. Burchell lived at 83 Ferris from at least 1862 to at least 1892. In May 1888 he wrote to the editor of the Brooklyn Eagle complaining of the conditions of Ferris street. He said Ferris between Partition and Dikeman was the dirtiest street he had ever seen in his twenty-five years in Brooklyn. It was not paved and when it rained a "great quantity of water" flowed "from the factory building". The water remained in large stagnent pools and the mud was sometimes four inches thick. It was necessary to use stilts to cross the street. There were no improvements on the street - no water or gas lines. "Another matter" was the chemical works at the foot of Dikeman street from which noxious air which was carried on the wind and bought sickness.

Ferris Street in the 1880 Federal Census

No. 83, contained 6 families, No 85 contained 1 family, No. 91 contained 5 families, No 93 contained 5 families, No 95 contained 5 families, No 97 contained 3 families. No 87 was NOT listed. Occupations of those on the block included: calker, engineer, calker, machine operator, laborer, iron moulder, boiler maker, boiler maker, hat trimmer, laborer, errand boy, sailor, ship sealer, blacksmith, engineer, pattern maker, machinist, boiler maker, pattern maker, cooper, book binder, messenger boy, laborer, printer, carpenter, calker, liquor saloon at #85*, laborer, engineer, carpenter, soap maker, laborer, conductor, sailor, sailor.

The boiler makers, iron molders, pattern makers, and machinists may have worked across the street at Lidgerwood Iron Works. See Lidgerwood

Ethic background included: English, Irish, Scottish, German.

*See Liquor Stores in Red Hook

1896: 12th Ward committee meeting was held at Wickin's hall at 87 Ferris street. 87 Ferris street was also where the 9th district Convention was held in March 1896.

87 Ferris in the 1900 Federal Census

Ward 12, ED 166 page 12

  1. Carroll, Patrick, head, Jan 1865, age 34, born Ireland, married 5 years, immigrated 1888 Nat, ice cart driver. Mary, wife, Aug 1873, New York, 3 children 2 living, John P, son, May 1896, New York Catherine, daughter, June 1897 New York

  2. Griffin, Edward, June 1855, age 44, married 25 years, born Ireland, immigrated 1872, Nat., laborer, Mary J wife, age 45, 10 children 6 living, immigrated 1872, Edward, Jr., age 20, New York laborer, Mary age 18, picture mat maker, Margaret age 16, picture mat maker, Michael 12, James 10, John 9 children born NY.

    Michael Griffen age 12 was killed in August 14, 1900 when he was thrown from a "car" on the Fifth Avenue line at 64th street and Fifth Avenue. He landed some distance away with a broken neck. The car was crowded with passengers and was headed to Coney Island about 10 o'clock at night when it missed a curve in the road. John Durling, age 31 of 97 Ferris, was also also thrown from the vehicle and fractured his scull. He was taken to the Norwegian hospital where his case was deemed "hopeless".

    NYC Death Index: Griffin Michael 14 y Aug 14 1900 15868 Kings. John During was not listed in the NYC Death Index in 1900. They were in the 1892 census, but no address is given, 2nd ED 12th ward. On top of next page from where they were listed was noted "156 Conover". John Durring, born Germany, boarder age 33, cooper, was listed at 91 Ferris in the 1900 census.

  3. Hyland, Daniel age 45, married 26 years, immigrated 1870, laborer, Honora, wife, age 46, 9 children 4 living, Elizabeth daughter age 23, tin ware maker, William son age 18, iron worker, Ellen, daughter age 16, Anthony son age 9 children born NY.

More on 87 Ferris

87 Ferris contained a saloon run by the Siebe family from 1867 to 1878. See Siebe.

1880: No listing in the 1880 census at 87 Ferris.

The 1886 map indicates a wooden frame building at the back of the lot at No 87 Ferris. No building at the street.

1887: January 10, A fire at "85 Ferris" in the liquor store of Peter "Dolan" extended to the house of George A. Higgins at 87 Ferris.

1888: May 26, Peter "Dallon" proposed a one story frame extensions 16x28 to store at "87 Ferris" street to cost $400.

1888: No listed under Dolan, Dollan, Dalon, Dallon in 1888 directory.

1896: January 22, the 16 member 12th Ward committee met at Wickins' Hall at 87 Ferris Street. Before adjourning the committee voted to hold a picnic at Bay View Park on Decoration Day.

1896: March, the 9th district Republican committee met at 87 Ferris street.

1904: The 1904 map of the area shows a 2 story wood frame structure at curb side and a 2 a half wood frame structure at the back of the lot. Access to the back building appears to be thru the side lot ar 89 or thru the front building.

81 Ferris

81 Ferris was shown as a brick building on the 1886 map.

1889: Sarah Conners, 2 months, died St. Catherine's Hospital, address 81 Ferris street, October 7,

1889: 81 Ferris, 4 story brick

1890: Lain's Business Directory, 81 Ferris, Cain, William H. Liquor

1893: William H. Kane died January 18, 1893, 81 Ferris street 2nd floor. (Family Tree maker William H. Kane)

1899: Liquor store Trow's Business Directory, Leonard, Charles, 81 Ferris stret, Brooklyn

1914: Liquor, Leach, George S. and Hicks, John C.

By 1952 81 Ferris street was a one store frame when a fire broke out in the vacant building.

83 Ferris

1875: To LET bakery, store three rooms rent very low, $15 per month.

1880:

  1. Duglas, Andrew, 41, caulker, Catherine, 36, Clara, 6, Jennie 4 Lillie 1 all born New York

  2. Brown, Isaac, 38, engineer, Catherine 36, born New York, Isaac 8, Stephen 5, David 4, born New Jersey, Elias 2 Catherine 4 months born New York, Burchell, John 57, caulker, boarder

  3. Scott, Sarah 47 born Ireland, Jane, sister machine operator, born Ireland

  4. Campbell, John 33, laborer, Mary 32, both born Ireland, John 7 Frank 2 both born New York

  5. Emery, William 50 iron moulder, Scotland, Margaret 40 born Scotland, Margaret 17, William 17 book binder, George 17 messenger boy, Frederick 10, Edward 3, children all born New York

  6. Runag--, John 47 laborer, born Germany, Annie daughter 18, born New York Reenie ?? wife 52 born Germany, Louis 20 son printer born Germany, John "10 months" "son" born New York

  7. Duane, James, 41 carpenter, Alice 35, both born Ireland, Catherine 11 born LA, Mary 10 born LA, William son 8 born LA and a boarder, calker born Maine age 33

1881: Katie Duane age 12, who lived on the 2nd floor of 83 Ferris died by accident while trying to light a fire using kerosene. Her mother, Eliza ran to her rescue but was not able to help her.

1886: 83 Ferris was shown as a brick building on the 1886 map.

1889: Dennis McFeeley of 83 Ferris street while intoxicated got into a fight with Thomas O'Shaughnessy. Both were locked up.

1897: HAFF Rebecca wid Geo W. h 83 Ferris

1907 and 1909: 83 Ferris street near Dikeman, 4 story brick double tenement lot 30x100 - for sale by auction

1934: 83 Ferris street was condemned and ordered vacant.

85 Ferris

1879: 85 Ferris street, liquors, Strikehorn, Charles

1880: Strichan (Stuchan), Charles, age 38, liquor saloon, born Germany, Charles, age 7, John age 4, Augustus, age 7, Fredrick age 8 months, Atkinson, Michael age 50 boarder Ireland, laborer

No one else listed at No. 85 in 1880.

1875: Ward 12 no address, Near Dwight, Charles Streichhehn, 35, Germany, mill store, Caroline 35, George Winas, 16 step son, Charles Streichhern age 2 and Mary daughter age 3 months.

85 Ferris was shown as a frame building on the 1886 map.

1887: January 10, 1887, BLAZE IN RED HOOK POINT -

A fire broke out around 11 o'clock on January 9th in the liquor store of Peter Dolan at 85 Ferris street.
"The building, which is an old frame structure, was very dry and burned fiercely."
Damage to the building $1,500. Loss of stock and fixtures $1,000. Insurance $1,500 on stock and building.

The fire extended to the house of George A Higgins, 87 Ferris with damage amounting to $500 for loss of furniture. One fireman was injured when he slipped off a ladder.

1887/1889: Peter Dolan was NOT listed in the 1887 or 1889 Brooklyn directory at Ferris street.

89 Ferris

1880: No one listed at 89 Ferris in 1880.

The 1886 map shows a small wooden frame building at the front of the lot.

The 1904 map of the area shows a cooper's shop and barrel at 89 Ferris.

In 1921 James Delaney, of 89 Ferris and 179 Dikeman streets, Brooklyn Truckman and Cartman , was advertising auto and horse drawn trucks for removing of garbage, ashes, sweepings and refuse from ships, factories and office buildings.

91 Ferris

1880 Census:

  1. Thomas Hamilton, age 47, sailor and his wife, Mary, 35, and daughter Ellen, 18, were listed a No. 91 in 1880. Thomas B. Hamilton, of 91 Ferris Street, age 56, died on July 5, 1887 from injuries received while hoisting barrels at the foot of Dikeman street. His skull was fractured.

  2. Maferey family: Eliza age 47, keeping house, George, son age 28, boiler maker, William 19, Sarah, 15, Isabelle, 13, Daniel 8, John 6.

The 1886 map shows a wood frame building.

95 Ferris

The 1886 map shows a wood frame building.

97 Ferris

The 1886 map shoes a wood frame building.

81 to 97 Ferris

The 1880 map shows brick buildings at 81, 83, 95 and 97. Wood frame at 85, 91 and 93. Nothing at 89. A rear wood frame at 87.

The 1907 map of Red Hook shows brick buildings at 81, 83, 95 and 97. There were wood frame buildings at 87, 91 and 93. Nothing at 85. Only a rear wood frame building at 89.


Photo Maggie Land Blanck, December 2013

These two wood frame houses are not on Ferris street. They are around the corner on the north side of Partition. The 1886 map does indicate two wood frame building on this site. It is possible that the wood frame building at the rear of 87 Ferris Street, which was the home of the Kettler family in 1889, was similar.

Ferris near King

In 1889 Mr. F Black was planning to build two three story brick dwellings each 25x54 each to house six families on Ferris street near King.

Non Residential Ferris Street

In 1886 the block between Van Dyke and Partition (later Coffey) streets was strictly commercial with the multi storied German American Stores (Warehouse) on the west side of the street and one story warehouses on the east side of the street.

In the block between Partition and Dikeman (which contained 81 to 97 Ferris street housing) the west side of the street was occupied by Lidgerwood.

The blocks between Dikeman and the Atlantic basin were relatively empty in 1886.

In March 1894 the Smith Resin works on Dykeman street near Ferris caught fire, as resin works were wont to do. In this case it was arson; a pile of rages were soaked with kerosene, covered with rubbish, and set ablaze.

See Lidgerwood, Industry and Commerce in Red Hook


Wolcott street


84 Wolcott street

In the 1888-89 Directory Fritz "Ketler" was listed at 84 Wolcott street.

84 Wolcott is on the north side of Wolcott between Van Brunt and Richards.

The 1898 and 1907 map show a wooden frame building at this address.

1889: Death , February 4, KRETSCHMAR, Minnie, 8 days, 84 Wolcott st.

Henry W. Lewis, 84 Wolcott street, 1897:

According to an article of June 5, 1897 Henry W. Lewis of 84 Wolcotts street, Brooklyn was in the Ford Theater in Washington, D. C. on April 14, 1865, the night Lincoln was shot. Mr. Lewis age 62, had been a seaman. By the time he was 20 years old he had been around the world. In April 1865 he was serving on the transport Constitution when she arrive in Washington. He and some of his mates went to the theater to see "My American cousin" because they had heard that Lincoln and Grant would be there.

A later article stated that Henry W. Lewis had "plied between Washington and the Army of the Potomac in Virginia" during the war. Lewis claimed to have seen Lincoln several times but to never have seen Grant. Lewis also claimed to have been in Charleston aboard the Nashville on April 12, 1861 when the Civil War started.

1865: Ward 12, Henry Lewis 30, seaman,at sea, born England, Anne Lewis 30, born Ireland, Thomas Lewis 8, Mary J Lewis 7, John Lewis 3, Christopher Lewis 0

1870: Ward 12, Henry Lewis 36, painter, Anne Lewis 35, Thomas Lewis 14, Mary Lewis 12, John Lewis 9, Margaret Lewis 4, Andrew Lewis 1

1875: Ward 12, Henry Lewis 41, painter, Ann Lewis 40, Thomas Lewis 18, Mary J Lewis 16, John Lewis 14, Margaret Lewis 8, Andrew Lewis 6

1880: 268 Van Brunt, Henry Lewis 44, painter, born England, Annie Lewis 44, born Ireland, Thomas Lewis 22, castings, Mary J. Lewis 20, John Lewis 18, painter, Maggie Lewis 13, Henry Lewis 11

1892: Ward 12, Lewis, Henry age 55 born Wales, painter, Ann age 55 born Ireland, John 25 painter, Andrew 21 painter, Maggie 22,

1894: Wolcott street n e s 140 feet from Van Brunt 23x100 Thomas F. Lewis to Henry W. Lewis

1896: July, Anna Roach Lewis wife of Henry W. Lewis died at her residence 84 Wolcott street - buried Greenwood.

1899: Aug 11, Lewis, Henry William at 84 Wolcott street died August 9th. Buried Greenwood.

1900: H. W. Lewis was the owner of 84 Wolcott street - between Ferris and Dwight - when a petition was made to be repave the street with granite block or asphalt.

84 Wolcott is no longer standing.


39 Wolcott Street -build 1897

Photo Maggie Land Blanck, Aug 2012

39 Wolcott Street - Date of 1897 in cornice.


Conover Street


189 Conover Street

The 1880, 1886 and 1907 maps show a brick building at 189 Conover.

2012 Google images show the building boarded up. 189 Conover is in the block between Dikemann and Coffey (Formerly Partition Street).

The 1886 map shows three substantial buildings, 185 thru 189 on the east side of Conover near Dikeman.

Christian Petermann, the son of Johann Petermann and Sophia Steuer, was born at this address in 1883.

The birth certificate is a little confusing. It lists "Place of birth 189 Conover Street. Originally 282 Conover Street was entered and they 189 was overwritten. Mother's res: 282 Conover Street. I do NOT know why these should be different, but I believe that the family lived at 189 Conover.

"Benjamin" Petermann was listed as a butcher, home, 189 Conover street in the 1884 Brooklyn Directory

See Berend Petermann

Businesses on this block of Conover:

201 Conover Street: In 1888 the Excise Board received a request for a licenses for a liquor saloon at 201 Conover street. The application was made in the name of Peter Smith for Peter Carroll. Smith was the barkeep for the establishment. Carroll owned another bar - location unnamed. There was some controversy about issuing the licences as it was unclear who actually owned the saloon.

1885: H. M. E. "Palmer" was listed as a provisions merchant at 208 Conover. In 1881 H. M. E. "Thorman" was listed as a provisions dealer at 206/208 Conover. By 1884 he was processing pork in barrels. Then in July 1884 his establishment burned.

See Thorman

See Finkeldey

See Petermann

Photo Maggie Blanck, 189 Conover Street, Red Hook, Brooklyn, 2003.

Photo Maggie Blanck, 189 Conover Street, Red Hook, Brooklyn, August 2012.

1880:

The 1880 United States Federal listed three families at 189 Conover Street.
  1. Stevens, John age 40 longshoreman, Prussia, no of months unemployed in last year = 3, Anna wife age 31, keeps house, New York, William son age 8, goes to school, Annie daughter age 6, August son age 4, Edward son age 3, all children born in New York

    They were in the 1892 censes Ward 12 ED7, no indication of street address.

  2. Stefferns, Christ, age 43, longshoreman, born Germany, Louisa wife age 42, born German, Emma daughter age 14 goes to school, Fredrick age 7 goes to school, Charles son age 5, Henry son age 2, children all born New York

  3. Kars, Peter age 43, junkman, no of months unemployed in last year 6, born Holland, Kalasani age 43, wife, consumption, born Holland, Mariah age 8 daughter, goes to school, Minni daughter age 3, Children born New York

At 187 Conover - families. Occupations: barber, 3 longshoreman, drives pork wagon, 2 workers in soap factory, and a lighterman.

At 191 one family. Drives provisions.

At 193 5 families. Occupations: grocery/candy store, farmer, painter, laborer and a bartender 193 rear, painter.

A current real estate listing says the property was build in 1920. However, it is possible that the building that still stands at this address remains from the three buildings that were indicated on the 1886 map.


Corner of Dikeman and Conover

In 1871 there was a liquor store on the corner of Dikeman and Conover run by Andrew Doyle, age 30, who was alleged to have raped a seven year old neighborhood girl. There was a candy store next to the liquor store. Andrew Doyle, 33, "still man", Hannah age 34 and Ellen, age 24 were listed in the 1870 census.

In 1880 John Madigan kept the liquor store at the corner of Dikeman and Conover when a fight broke out between between John Madigan, Patrick Ryan and Thomas Gordon. Gordon was "hurled" against a barrel receiving a sever gash to his head. He was taken to Long Island Hospital by ambulance and the two assailants arrested.


194 Conover Street

1879: Ludovic Meyer 194 Conover

1880:A "number of persons" were playing bagatelle in a bar at 194 Conover street run by Michael Considine. Considine was arrested for violating the Excise Law.

1892: Ward 12, no address give, Eggert, Gustav, 34, born Germany liquors, Sophie, age 30, Gustav age 6

1888: Gustave Eggert was an active member of the South Brooklyn German Guard.

1891: 194 Conover Gustav Eggert liquor

1895: Denied a transfer of a liquor license on the grounds that the location was residential - Gustav Eggert from 194 Conover Street to 167 Conover street. 167 Conover was also declared too close to a church.

1900: Mrs. Frederica Barschow [Barshaw] a junk dealer at 194 Conover street was charged with receiving property "without inquiring into its proper ownership". 175 pounds of lead were stolen by three boys from Frank Clark & sons of Dikeman Street for which she paid them $5.22. She was paroled on custody of her counsel.

A "crusade" against Mrs. "Barshaw" was undertaken by the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children who claimed she used small boys to pass stolen goods, fully aware that the the boys were juvenile burglars. Most of the stolen articles were lead pipe, wrought brass and copper wire. The insinuation was that she actually sent young boys ranging in age form 9 to 14 years out to steal. Three boys turned states evidence against her: Charles Johnson, George Faribrother, and William Hobson. "Frederica "Barshaw" of 194 Conover street", was arrested on this charge and was brought before Judge Bristow. Mrs. Barshaw was held on $500 bail.

"WOMEN IN FIELD MADE FAMOUS BY FAGIN, PUPILS MOIE APT IN THEFT THAN SCHOOL"

Sorrowing Mothers Tell' of Their Boys Being Enticed from Home and Taught to Steal.

ONE WOMAN UNDER ARREST

Brooklyn has at least one female Fagin, cording to the charges made by Robert J. Wilkin, the superintendent and attorney of the Brooklyn Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. He is convinced that both men and woman, in Brooklyn are teaching children to steal, and he is determined to prosecute In all cases that come to his attention. Mr. Wilkin is now preparing to prosecute Mrs. "Frederiea Barshaw", who conducts a junk shop In No. 194 Conover street, and who will be arraigned in the Butler Street Poliee Court next Thursday on a charge of receiving stolen property from schoolboys. Mr. Wilkin says there have been similar complaints against other women.

Four boys sho live with their parents in te nement houses near the Junk shop conducted by Mrs. "Barshaw", were arrested last Thursday, charged with stealing 175 pounds of lead from the yard of Frank Clark & Son, coppersmiths, No. 163 Dlkeman street. The prisoners were Charlea Johnson, George Fairbrother and Robert and William Johnson. One of the boys said he stole the lead, and the others said it had been sold to Mrs. Barshaw for $6.20. Mr. Wilkin said to me last night: "Women living in the neighborhood of Conover street tell me that their sons remain away from home at night, and that they sleep in junk shops. One woman says her son slept in a junk shop for a week, and was sent out by the owner of tbe shop to steal." "Is that woman the mother, of one of the boys in this case?" I asked. "I am not saying what case her son is in but the woman lives in the neighborhood form which these boys come."

New York Herald

1894: Friederika Barschow 30 Friedrich Barschow 7 Edward Barschow 5 to Brooklyn, residence USA 2 Aug 1894, ship Columbia, Hamburg Lines, From german to New york,

1900: Conover street Frederick C Barschow 39, metal dealer, Fredericka Barschow 35 Frederick Barschow 12 Edward J Barschow 11 Harry A Barschow 4

1910: The Fredrick Barshow Association will hold their grand trolley outing tomorrow from Baumann's Hotel, Wolott and Richards streets, to Ulmer Park. Two illuminated trolley cars will carry the members and friends to the park.

1913: Real Estate Wolcott st s e cor Dwight to F Barschow 24 Dikeman st mort $-,500

1919: FOR SALE AUTOMOBILES, Cadillac - 7 passenger model, fine condition, fully equipped; no dealers. F. C. BARSCHOW & SONS. 10 Coffey St., Brooklyn. N. Y. Phone Hamilton ----

1920: 11 Wollcott street, Frederick Barschow Male 58 Married White Head 1862 Germany 1873 Germany Germany A Junk Dealer,
Frederica Barschow Female 56 Married White Wife 1864 Germany 1880 Germany Germany A
Frederick Barschow Jr. Jr Male 33 Single White Son 1887 New York Germany Germany A manager junk shop,
Harry Barschow Male 23 Single White Son 1897 New York Germany Germany A chauffer junk shop
Margaret Johnsen Female 44 Single White Servant

1922: Passport application of Fred Barshow, born Mecklenberg Schwerin Germany May 26, 1861 to Hanry Barschow, imm. from Hamburg May 1873, address 24 Dikeman street, Brooklyn, Iron and Metal Business, personal business 3 to 4 months.

1922: Henry F.C. Barschow & Sons Scrap Iron, Steel and Metals Yards, 10 COFFEY STREET

1925: DEATH NOTICES. "BARSCHOW" - Suddenly on Saturday Dec. 5, 1925. Frederick, beloved husband of Fredericka Barschow. Funeral services at his late residence 24 Dikeman St. Interment Greenwood Cemetery

BARSCHOW FREDERICK C. 1925-12-08 19694

1930: Dikeman street Frederick Barschew 43, dealer junk, Fredricka Barschew 66, none, Margaret Johnson 55, servant

1940: 24 Dikeman street street, Fredericka Barschow Head F 76 Germany, widowed, owner, iron foundry, own business, Frederick Barschow Son M 52 New York, manager iron foundry, Sadie Barschow Daughter-in-law F 48 New York Marion Barschow Granddaughter F 24 New York

1941: The Government recently took a series of pictures of the scrap-metal yard of F. C. Barschow & Sons', at 10 Coffey St. Idea was to show that the scrap wasn't moving. When we took this picture Barschow said it was moving all the time 5,300,000 pounds in the three months following a fixed ceiling of $15.33 a gross ton.

"U. S. Photos Show Piles Of Unused Scrap Metal A series of photographs taken by Government cameramen in October, November and last week were offered to a House committee in Washington yesterday as evidence that piles of scrap metal have lain in dealers' yards - in one case a Brooklyn dealer's - for as long as three months. One set of pictures showed that a pile of scrap in the yard of F. C. Barschow & Sons, 10 Coffey St., Brooklyn, had been undisturbed since October, when the first pictures were taken at the order of the (Office of Price Administration. The pictures, shown to the Patman Small Business Committee, were offered as evidence that, while many steel mills have curtailed operations for lack of scrap metal, piles of steel and iron have lain for months in yards throughout the country."
1946: Harry Barshow age 21 was fatally shot by a gun his friends though was not loaded. Panic stricken they removed his body from the house where the shooting occurred and dumped in front of 71 Dikeman street. The soon gave themselves up at the Union street station.

1961:

Solemn Requiem Mass for Anna Barschow, 62, wife Harry Barschow, head of scrap iron firm of S. C. Barschow and Sons, 10 Coffey was offered today at Visitation church. She died Friday at Long Island College Hospital. Mrs. Barschow, a lifelong resident of Brooklyn, lived at Dikeman St., Red Hook. She was a member of the Holy Sosary Society of Visitation church. In addition to her husband, she is survived by a son Walter, and a daughter, Margaret Barschow. Burial is in Holy Cross Cemetery.

See Red Hook Butchers

1900: Barber shop - 1901 Thomas Devine Barber 194 Conover (Not listed in 1898)

1906: Barber shop - Thomas Devine 194 Conover Barber

1908: Barber shop

1911: Barber shop

1912: The Murder of Thomas Devine

On February 20th Thomas Devine, a wealthy barber age 55 who lived at 194 Conover street, was shot in the left temple and died. He was found lying at the foot of the third floor stairway of his "elaborately furnished home" - a three story brick which he owned. He was fully dressed. At least three shots had been fired. All the doors and windows to the building were locked from the inside and the police had to break in. Devine's own revolver was found in his dresser drawer fully loaded with blank cartridges. It had not been fired.

Devine was reputed to have made a fortune of about $100,000 by "judicious investments". It was also said that he made jewelry as a sideline. The first floor contained the two businesses and Devine and his step daughter, Sophie McCormick a "comely" blond age 28, lived on the upper two floors. Sophie had the rear bedroom and Devine slept in an adjoining bedroom with a door that connected the two rooms.

Sophie Mccormick called for help from the third floor window about 8:15. She said she heard shots and ran out of her room to find Devine's body. Since she was the only other person in the building and all the doors were locked, Sophie was arrested on suspicion of the murder. Forensic evidence showed that the shots were fired from the third floor down at Devine. She told the police of a wrong done to her by her step father several months before. She was committed to Kings County Hospital to determine her sanity. Her brother, Louis McCormick, age 25 a former policeman attached to the Hamilton Ave station but then a farmer in Spring Valley, New York said Sophie was insane. It was also said that Louis McCormick had repeatedly argued with Devine.

Devine had lived in the neighborhood for about 20 years. He had been married twice. His second wife, Sophie, (the mother of Sophie) died in 1904. Devine had no children of his own by either wife.

A thirteen year old girl, who lived at 139 Conover, said she heard a pistol shot and a minute later she saw Sophie Mccormick stick her head out the third floor window and yell for help. The girl waited until the police came and was certain that no one came to or left the building until the police arrived. The wife of the butcher next door confirmed the girl's statement.

A box of Devine's important papers which supposedly contain his will was missing. The box was eventually found buried in the cellar. There was money and jewelry on the premisses so robbery was rulled out as a motive. No gun was found. Louis Mccormick was questioned by the police and released. Sophie was charged with the murder.

By February 27 Sophie had not come to trial and was still being examined for her sanity.

In March the question of Sophie Mccormick sanity was still not settled.

The case finally came to trial in August 23, 1912.

I can't find the result online. However in 1920 McCormick, Sophia, age 37, was a "insane inmate" in the Kings Park State Hospital in Smithtown, Long Island and in 1940 Sophie McCormick, age 55 born New York, was a patient in the Pilgrim State Mental Hospital in Central Islip.

More on Thomas Devine:

1880: Hamilton Ave. Devine, Thomas age 24, barber boarder, born England, parents Irish.

1890: Thomas Devine haridresser, Huntington near Henry

1892: Ward 12, Brooklyn, addresses are not listed on this census and it is hard to know where one family ends and another begins. McCormick, Sophie age 11, Louse age 12 - others near them Eggert (Gustav), Meyer and Hutfoff. In 1891 Gustav Eggert was listed as a liquor store at 194 Conover. If as indicated in the 1900 census Thomas Devine and Sophie had been married 7 years they were married circa 1893.

1900: Ward 12, 194 Conover street, Thomas Devine 39, barber, married 7 years, born New York parents Irish, Sophia Devine 38, married 7 years, 2 children, two living, Louis Mc Comack 20, US N, Sophia Mc Comack 17 - Two family.

1904: Sophie Devine died in 1904. Greenwood DEVINE SOPHIA 1904-08-12 27263 135 - age 46 died Aug 9, 1904 Kings

1910: 4 family, 194 Conover, Devine, Thomas, widowed, 47, barber shop, McCormick, Sophia, step daughter, age 24, no occupation and a boarder, barber.

Greenwood Cemetery:
DEVINE JOSEPHINE* 1897-10-22 27263 135 - age 11 Kings (NYC DI)
DEVINE THOMAS 1912-02-24 27263 135 - died 2.20.12 age 59 Kings (NYCDI)
DEVINE EDWARD 1928-01-06 27263 135 - age 17 Manhattan (NYCDI)
DEVINE JAMES P*. 1897-11-21 27263 135 - James "R" - age 13 - 18 Nov 1897 Kings (NYCDI)
DEVINE JANE A. 1898-01-15 27263135 - age 71, Kings, (NYCDI)
DEVINE JOSEPH E.* 1913-04-09 2726 3135 - age 67, Kings (NTYCDI)
And Sophia in 1904 - see above.

*Family of Joseph Devine carpenter.

194 Conover no longer stands.


282 Conover Street

282 Conover Street was listed as the residence of the "mother" at the birth of Christina Petermann in 1883. 282 Conover would have been down close to the water near Reed street.

The 1886 and 1889 maps shows only one occupied building in that block. It is not numbered.


Corner of Conover and Reed

In 1861 there was a murder suicide at the grocery liquor store on the corner of Reed and Conover. Bernard Reenan the liquor store owner shot his wife, Ellen, eight times with a double barrel "fowling piece" and then drown himself. The building was described as "brick, three stories in height".
"The husband was 40 years old; the wife 35. She is represented as a sober, industrious women, and he as a drunkard."
They left three orphans ages 6 months to seven years.
"The parties are native of Ireland"

Barney Reenan was listed with a Tavern at the corner of Conover and Reed streets in 1854

In 1875 there was an assault with a "broken beer bottle" at the corner of Reed and Conover.

In 1876 there was a stabbing in the "liquor saloon" of Michael Costello at the corner of Conover and Reed. The fight was over a card debt.

Thorman


226 Conover Street

Gertrude Kettler spent 4 and a half years in the Brooklyn Orphans Asylum Atlantic Avenue. She was discharged April 3, 1901 to her mother who gave her address as 226 Conover Street. 226 Conover street was not a residential property in 1901. In fact, warehouses had been located at this address from at least 1886.

When Frederick Kettler jr was released from the orphanage in September 1901 Hanna Kettler gave her address at 407 Forth street, Hoboken, N. J.

Fritz Kettler


Sullivan


33 Sullivan

1901: Candy store


56-60 Sullivan


New York Public Library digital collection, Citation/reference: 0279-E2, P. L. Sperr June 25, 1931

56-60 Sullivan Street near Richards - North side west of Richards

The 1886 map show St Paul M. E. Church at 56 Sullivan. 58 Sullivan is shown as a brick structure and 60 is shown as a wood frame structure.

In 1918 The Y. M. C. A extended its work to merchant seaman when it took over the Bethel Ship Norwegian Sailors Mission at 56 Sullivan street, Brooklyn. It remained connected to the Bethel Ship Merchant Seamen's Institute into the 1940s.

1922:

The first building to be erected anywhere by the Young Men's Christian Association for merchant seamen is nearing completion on the corner of Richards and Sullivan streets, Brooklyn. It is being built by the Brooklyn Y. M. C. A. and will be known as the James Harvey Williams Memorial, as its erection was made possible by a gift of $60,000 by Mrs. James Harvey Williams in memory of her husband, who died in 1904. It will make possible a great enlargement of the work which the Brooklyn Y. M. C. A. has conducted for merchant seamen at this port since 1918.

The building is of concrete faced with brick and has a frontage of fifty feet on Sullivan street and eighty-five feet on Richards street. It has six floors. On the first floor will be the lobby, which will be the chief social centre for the building. Lobby talks will be a feature and will afford opportunity for the presentation of many matters of interest and importance to seamen, a motion picture machine to be installed will help make effective messages of this kind. On this floor will be the general offices of the branch, also the barber shop, restaurant, tailor shop, reading room and writing tables.

The chief features of the second floor will be the recreation room with facilities for recreative games and athletics. This room, with a seating capacity of over 400, will have a large stage which will make possible a variety of entertainment. On the three upper floors are ninety-five separate bedrooms which will be simply but adequately furnished. These will be rented to merchant seamen at nominal rates. On the top floor there will be a small infirmary and a matron's room. On each of the dormitory floors will be shower baths and toilet facilities. Because of these features the building will make a strong appeal to merchant seamen when on shore.

This new building will be supplemented by the old building next to it on Sullivan St. Improvements costing $11,500, which provide an enlarged restaurant and dunnage room, are being made here also. The total outlay for the new building, furnishings and improvements to original building will be about $200,000.

American Shipping, Volume 15

Mrs. Williams was the wife of J. H. Williams of the drop forge. See Williams Drop Forge

See annarobinsonsweet.blogspot plaque commemorating the Bethelship Seamen's YMCA

In 1942 an article in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle stated that there was a church adjoining the "Y" had been converted into a gymnasium.


67 Sullivan

1901: Carpenter


74-82 Sullivan

The three buildings in this image are numbers 78 to 82 - right to left. The 1886 map shows No. 82 as a 21 ft wide brick structure, No. 80 as a 20 foot frame structure and No. 78 as a 25 ft frame structure. None of them are now standing.
Sullivan Street - Richards Street 1931

74-82 Sullivan Street, north side, between Richards and Van Brunt, June 25, 1931.

New York City Public Library, Sperr, Percy Loomis, 1890-1964 -- Photographer, 365056

78 Sullivan was listed in an 1838 ad.

78 Sullivan was up for auction in October 1942 as part of the estate of Edward Bell, deceased. He had properties at 123 Pioneer, 78 Sullivan, 140 Dwight, 110 King and 85 Wolcott.

In 1872 one John Smith, single laborer, was charged with burglary in the second degree. For "some years" Mr. Smith was a boarder "in the house of Mrs. Moser, a respectable widow, at No. 82 Sullivan street, in the classic region of Red Hook." Also living in the building on the first floor was Mrs. Frances Champion, "the wife of a steward on a canal boat". Mr. Champion was absent two or three months at a time. Smith entered the apartment of Mrs. Champion though a window. There was a suggestion that Smith and Mrs. Champion were on "familiar terms".


Clinton Street

Clinton Street Brooklyn runs from the Gowanus Bay at the bottom of Red Hook to Tillary Street in Brooklyn Heights.

Brooklyn Museum, January 2012,

Repaving Clinton, Street George Bradford Brainerd, American 1845-1887, Brooklyn Museum/Brooklyn Public Library, Brooklyn Collection

Brooklyn Museum, January 2012,

Clinton Street, George Bradford Brainerd, American 1845-1887, Brooklyn Museum/Brooklyn Public Library, Brooklyn Collection

Brooklyn Museum, January 2012,

Clinton Street, George Bradford Brainerd, American 1845-1887, Brooklyn Museum/Brooklyn Public Library, Brooklyn Collection


Columbia Street

Columbia Street ran from the Erie Basin to Fulton Street.

Columbia Street used to be the main shopping street in the Red Hook - Carroll Gardens section of Brooklyn until the BQE cut the neighborhood in two.

The Gt. Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. had a store at 268 Columbia Street (between Carroll and Summit sts.) Brooklyn in 1886

Brooklyn Museum, January 2012,

George Bradford Brainerd, American 1845-1887, Brooklyn Museum/Brooklyn Public Library, Brooklyn Collection

Brooklyn Museum, January 2012,

Columbia Street, George Bradford Brainerd, American 1845-1887, Brooklyn Museum/Brooklyn Public Library, Brooklyn Collection


Beard Street - Elizabeth Street Street

In 1897 the name Elizabeth street (from Columbia Street to Ferris Street) was changed to Beard street.


Wood Frame Houses - Huntington Street between Hicks and Henry


Brooklyn Public Library Brooklyn collection

Wood frame houses Huntington Street - between Hicks and Henry


Red Hook Streets 1886
  1. Ferris - north south between Elizabeth and William in 1886

  2. Conover - north south between the water and Hamilton in 1886

  3. Imlay - north south between William (Pioneer) and Hamilton in 1886

  4. Van Brunt - north south between the water and Hamilton in 1886 - it was (and still is) the main commercial drag.

  5. Richards - north south between the water and Hamitlon in 1886

  6. Dwight - north south between the water and Columbia in 1886

  7. Columbia - north south between the water and beyond Hamilton in 1886

  8. Reid (Reed) east west between the Conover and Van Brunt in 1886

  9. Elizabeth - (now called Beard Street) east west between the Conover and Dright in 1886

  10. Van Dyke - east west between the water and Dwight in 1886

  11. Partition - (now called Coffey street) east west between the water and Dwight in 1886

  12. Dikeman - east west between the water and Dwight in 1886

  13. Wolcott - east west between the water and Dwight in 1886

  14. Sullivan - east west between the water and Dwight in 1886 (now stops at Richards)

  15. King - east west between the water and Richards in 1886

  16. William - (now called Pioneer street) east west between Conover and Richards in 1886

  17. Tremont - (now called Visitation Place) east west between Van Brunt and Richards in 1886

  18. Verona - east west between Conover and Richards in 1886

  19. Delavan - east west between Van Brunt and Dwight in 1886

  20. Commerce - East west between Conover and Columbain in 1886

  21. Seabring - east west between Van Brunt and Columbia in 1886

  22. Bowne - east west between Conover and Columbia in 1886

  23. Rapelye - east west between Van Brunt and Henry in 1886. Rapelye Street now extends east west between Hamilton and Henry. Named for Joris Jansen Rapelje who was a member of the Dutch West India company.

  24. Summit - east west between Conover and Van Brunt in 1886

  25. Hamilton - main commercial drag forming the northern boundary of Ward 12 in 1886

Some of the Red Hook Streets were laid out in 1846:
"Wolcott street, Sulllivan street, and King street, lying between the westerly line of Conover street and the water line, as said streets and water line are laid down on the map of the city of Brooklyn, made by the commissioners appointed "To lay out streets, avenues and squares in the city of Brooklyn," and so much and such parts of William street, Tremont street, Ewer street, Delavan street, Commerce street, Seabring street, Bowne street, Rapelye street, Summit street, and River street, lying between the westerly line of Van Brunt street and the water line, as said streets and water line are laid down on the said map; and so much and such parts of Ferris street, lying between the northerly line of Dikeman street and the southerly line of Harrison street; and so much and such parts of Conover street lying between the northerly line of William street and the southerly line of Hamilton avenue; and so much and such parts of West street, or Hale street, lying between the northerly line of Hamilton avenue and the southerly line of Harrison street, as said streets and avenue are laid down on said map; and also so much and such parts of Coles street, Cooper street, Rapelye street, Woodhull street and Summit street, between Henry street and Smith street"

Laws of the State of New York By New York (State)


SECOND PLACE - CHURCHES IN RED HOOK - NORWEGIANS IN RED HOOK - Other Images of Brooklyn - LIFE IN RED HOOK MID TO LATE 1800S - RED HOOK TAVERNS SALOONS AND LIQUOR STORES IN THE MID TO LATE 1800S Red Hook Butchers - Red Hook Celebrities - Red Hook Restaurants - Red Hook Waterfront

HOME - FRITZ KETTLER - HANNA PETERS - JOHANN BEREND PETERMANN - IMMIGRATION

Adams Lumber - Atlantic Flour - Chesebrough/Vaseline - Eagleton Sprint Co. - P. H. Gill & Sons Forge and Machine Works - Lidgerwood - New York Wire and Rope - Pioneer Iron Works - South Brooklyn Iron - Brooklyn Clay Retort - James H. Williams, Drop Forging - Worthington Hydraulic Pump Works - Richardson and Boynton Stoves and Furnaces

DeMars Kentucky Jeans manufacturers of overalls - Lewis and Dorothea De Mars -339 Van Brunt


A Preservation Plan for Red Hook, Brooklyn Lots of good images and information on the history of Red Hook

History of the Isthmian Steamship Lines, Erie Basis, Red Hook Brooklyn includes an arial view of the Erie Basin Terminal and tons of other images and information


Port Side, Cultural Tourism

History of the Isthmian Steamship Lines, Erie Basis, Red Hook Brooklyn includes an arial view of the Erie Basin Terminal and tons of other images and information

Red Hook Waterfront, The O'Connell Organization is a family owned and operated real estate development business. Clearly they love the Red Hook waterfront and their website contains some fabulous photos of the old warehouses and other buildings in Red Hook.

Port Side, Cultural Tourism

Water Front Museum and Showboat Barge

Brooklyn Memories

A Preservation Plan For Red Hook 2009

Red Hook Flickr Group

Russell Granger has a magnificent collection of early Brooklyn images at Whitman's Brooklyn

If you have any suggestions, corrections, information, copies of documents, or photos that you would like to share with this page, please contact me at maggie@maggieblanck.com

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Thanks,

Maggie


© Maggie Land Blanck - Page created 2015 - Latest update March 2016